Brand new programming baby

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Hi there,
you've no doubt had this 10 thousand times before. but i havn't been here before so hope you guys can lead me in the right direction.

im 32 years old, im wanting to get into programming for the first time in my life as i want a career change. C++ just interests me SOOO much at the moment that i want to learn it.
Now i don't even know where i want to go when and if i become proficient in the language but just want some general advice.

1) should i learn C++ as my first language, or would you suggest something different/easier first considering the fact that i don't know what i want to get out of learning the subject.

2) am i too old being 32 to start with programming and might not be able to get a decent job within any type of programming related industry due to the trend of young programming geniuses having popped up all over the world

3) if you did suggest i go with C++, how long do you think it would take approx for me to learn it to a reasonable level considering im teaching myself from home. I have 1 training dvd that cost me 99 dollars, and 4 C++ books that i bought.

Thanks alot for your time.

ps: im not seeing in any of these books any pictures of what the code is used for, i mean for instance in a game or a program, how do you assign code to a command that when someone presses a menu for instance, a lovely colorful menu comes up for them. Is that actually made from code or are they designed in different visual programs and you're just telling the code to open the picture and laying the options text ontop of the menu picture?

just a musing!

Tony Q

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If you are a beginner then you need no less than three years of learning C++ that to feel yourself more or less confidently with the language
1. No reason why you shouldn't start with C++. Probably a good idea to learn one language at a time rather than try to learn two at once

2. You should probably look at being a "dual brainer" rather than just pure software development. Whatever your previous career it is likely that some software services are required by people there. Knowing a field of application as well as programming gives you a massive advantage over teenage computer geniuses. You will be able to speak the language and understand the requirements of the clients.
NB. This might have a bearing on what language you choose to learn. Many computer services are delivered over the web and C++ is not a language for end user web development. C++ is more associated with systems and high performance computing, games and native general purpose applications

3. Learning C++ takes forever, you will still be learning when you get a job

As regards GUI (graphical user interface) applications. C++ does not provide this functionality. You have to use libraries, of which there is a wide choice. Probably, as a learner, you will be writing text mode applications for a long time yet.


Also I would advice to learn either C# or Java instead of C++. It will be more effective.
Thanks for the fast replies guys. ok so you actually think that C++ is more or less too advances and specialised, and is more of a language that would be used if i'd been programming for years, and most companies are looking for more web related language knowlege and things like java than C++? like i was thinking it'd be cool to make applications, like in a private company making small applications to sell to local companies that are customized for them, such as little applications for cab offices etc, or for pizza places for their ordering system etc, these sound more java/c/vb than C++, is that correct?

a more specific question would be, just from say the typical programs i have on my pc, what would they be created in? for instance i have SpeedFan. an app for monitoring my PC's fan speeds and tempratures. it reads the sensors native to my mainboard. also what about maybe VLC media player, whats that created in, and lastly Spotify, these kind of apps would be great for me to learn how to code and create, are they all C++ or c# or do any of you know them? cheers

and again thanks for the replies
So you have no programming experience at all?

I started with C++ at age 34, but I knew JavaScript.
After a year of study now I can read and write in the standard C++ library, but truely I now know I have only scratched the surface of this language.
It feels 'jacked up' complicated and often overwhelming. But if you keep pushing yourself, you will get there. At this point in time start with 'Hello World' program and commit to learn one or two new features a day. And write a short program using each new feature as you learn it. Practice, practice, and more practice.
Thanks for the fast replies guys. ok so you actually think that C++ is more or less too advances and specialised, and is more of a language that would be used if i'd been programming for years, and most companies are looking for more web related language knowlege and things like java than C++?
No that's stupid.

C++ was my first -real- programming language. I'd say I like it a lot. Plus, you get the added bonus of learning some of C along the way (well a lot). Not to mention you'll have a general sense of Java.
Lumpkin wrote:
No that's stupid.
Starting off a post like this is generally not advised because it makes people think that you value your opinion more than others'.
@Lumpkin

No that's stupid.


It is funny when I hear from beginners such statements as "that is stupid".

As I said it is much better to learn Java or C# than C++. For example in fact C# is not just a language. It is a whole technolodgy of Microsoft. So if you are going for example to write programs in Windows then learn C# instead of C++.
Starting off a post like this is generally not advised because it makes people think that you value your opinion more than others'.
I didn't mean it like that.

It is a whole technolodgy of Microsoft.
I don't understand what you're saying.

So if you are going for example to write programs in Windows then learn C# instead of C++.
It really matters what you're doing.

C# is the answer in many cases though.
I thought C# was the languages and .NET was the software?

Also, personally I see there is no reason not to learn C++ at some point - it allows you to use procedural, functional, and object-oriented designs, each as you see fit. From C++ you can easily learn nearly all other languages. I can't say the same for Java or C#, though they are good languages to start with.
1.
Definitely C++ ,

2.
Why not?You just need to learn language and desire


3.
We can't say that ,everybody is diffirent,one can learn in 1month,other may spend like 1year to be able to create,let's say,Snake game.

Also ,if you have skype ,- Mantasxxl3 ,I have a group,if you want to learn it faster.



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im 32 years old, im wanting to get into programming for the first time in my life as i want a career change.


If you are learning programming with the purpose to get a job... the best thing to do would probably be to look at jobs first and see what's hiring in your area (or whatever area you want to work). No sense in learning C++ if everything around you is hiring Java programmers or vice versa.

This is largely regional... so don't trust what anyone on the internet tells you... They do not know what is available in your area. You'll have to look into this yourself and decide which language will be most "marketable" for your circumstances.

The process of learning takes time, and it's hard to predict how the job market will change over the course of your education... so really all you can do is keep an eye on it and adjust your education accordingly.

1) should i learn C++ as my first language, or would you suggest something different/easier first considering the fact that i don't know what i want to get out of learning the subject.


C++ is definitely one of the harder languages to start with. That doesn't mean it's a bad language to start with... but you certainly will not feel productive with it as quickly as you will with some other languages.

C++ is also an extremely broad language. Just learning C++ will not prepare you for all applications of the language... and if you spend all your time studying console and/or GUI elements, that info will largely be wasted when you get a job doing database work.

So again... see what's available.


Once you get enough experience under your belt, you'll be able to switch fields more easily... but I'm assuming you'll want to get hired before then.

2) am i too old being 32 to start with programming and might not be able to get a decent job within any type of programming related industry due to the trend of young programming geniuses having popped up all over the world


There's definitely a stigma associated with older programmers... but it's not insurmountable.

The problem is less about age and more about your ability to shift gears and learn new things. So really.. you have to answer this question for yourself. None of us can know your potential as well as you do.

3) if you did suggest i go with C++, how long do you think it would take approx for me to learn it to a reasonable level considering im teaching myself from home. I have 1 training dvd that cost me 99 dollars, and 4 C++ books that i bought.


Programming takes years to really "get". You'll be able to pick up basic concepts and things pretty quickly... and you'll even be able to apply them and make functional programs. But it won't "click" for a while. After it does... you'll look back at all your code that you wrote before and wonder what you were thinking when you wrote it.

You probably will not be able to get hired (or if you are, you will should not feel comfortable in a job) until you get over that first hurdle.

How long this takes is different for everyone. It depends how quickly you learn... how much code you've read... and how much code you've written. Assuming you'll also be working fulltime with another job during this process... it will probably take you years.
great thanks for your replies. i've started C++ now so i think i'll stick with it. do you know what spotify is made in?
C++, that's what a quick google told me.
OK guys you've been brilliant. i had a look at some c# and some c++ stuff and i think im just gonna finish what i started. I have a quick question though. Seeing as alot of advanced applications such as games are coded in C++. as i can't see anything visual with my tiny bits of code apart from dos commands.

Can you tell me for instance how you would do this in a game environment.
http://livingwithanerd.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/11/oblivion-book.jpg
meaning, how would you open a book in your game, and how is the text written onto the pages of the book in that particular font. is that all done outside of C++ and then just pulled in from an external place where you left it after designing it?

Just trying to wrap my head around the link between code and real objects
General idea:

Create the book via blender or photoshop, or whatever is used to create graphics for games nowadays.

Create a text box that will fit the dimensions of the book, write your text. Add any other buttons you want onto the book; like the 'next' button, 'exit' button.

Add all these to a function(book_of_oblivion).

In your code:
1
2
3
void onClick(Event evt) {
    new book_of_oblivion.visible(true);
}


Of course this a general idea of how it could be done. But this may not be the case in an actual implementation
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