Best C++ Books for completely new programmers?!

Hello,

I want to start coding, and I really need some good books that can explain me every single thing about C++ for new programmers.
I'm 16 years old, from Denmark, and I really want to program, because it is just so cool, and I find it interesting.
I come from Denmark, so I'm not first language English, so I do not know if it will be harder for me to learn programming, however, I found out the creator of C++ is from Denmark :D

I hope you can give me some perfect books for my situation!

Dario
Everyone keeps talking about C++ Primer. I'm not sure if it comes in Danish though.
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Hello usandfriends,

I researched a little bit about C++ Primer Plus, and the last version in 6th edition.
It says it's for beginners and intermediate, so I will give it a shot :-)
If there are anyone that have more suggestions for good books, please post them :)

Thank you usandfriends!

Dario
closed account (Dy7SLyTq)
so dario just want to get something out of the way, there is no book that will teach you everything because its just to big of a langauge.
I mean like, a book that can cover the things beginners needs to know.
Beginner

Introductory


If you are new to programming or if you have experience in other languages and are new to C++, these books are highly recommended.

C++ Primer† (Stanley Lippman, Josée Lajoie, and Barbara E. Moo) (updated for C++11) Coming at 1k pages, this is a very thorough introduction into C++ that covers just about everything in the language in a very accessible format and in great detail. The fifth edition (released August 16, 2012) covers C++11.

Accelerated C++ (Andrew Koenig and Barbara Moo) This basically covers the same ground as the C++ Primer, but does so on a fourth of its space. This is largely because it does not attempt to be an introduction to programming, but an introduction to C++ for people who've previously programmed in some other language. It has a steeper learning curve, but, for those who can cope with this, it is a very compact introduction into the language. (Historically, it broke new ground by being the first beginner's book using a modern approach at teaching the language.)

Thinking in C++ (Bruce Eckel) Two volumes; second is more about standard library, but still very good

Programming: Principles and Practice Using C++ (Bjarne Stroustrup) An introduction to programming using C++ by the creator of the language. A good read, that assumes no previous programming experience, but is not only for beginners.

† Not to be confused with C++ Primer Plus (Stephen Prata), with a significantly less favorable review.

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/388242/the-definitive-c-book-guide-and-list

Note: Thinking in C++ (Bruce Eckel) is also available as a free e-book
http://www.mindview.net/Books/TICPP/ThinkingInCPP2e.html
JLBorges wrote:
Beginner

Introductory

If you are new to programming or if you have experience in other languages and are new to C++, these books are highly recommended.

C++ Primer† (Stanley Lippman, Josée Lajoie, and Barbara E. Moo) (updated for C++11) Coming at 1k pages, this is a very thorough introduction into C++ that covers just about everything in the language in a very accessible format and in great detail. The fifth edition (released August 16, 2012) covers C++11.

Accelerated C++ (Andrew Koenig and Barbara Moo) This basically covers the same ground as the C++ Primer, but does so on a fourth of its space. This is largely because it does not attempt to be an introduction to programming, but an introduction to C++ for people who've previously programmed in some other language. It has a steeper learning curve, but, for those who can cope with this, it is a very compact introduction into the language. (Historically, it broke new ground by being the first beginner's book using a modern approach at teaching the language.)

Thinking in C++ (Bruce Eckel) Two volumes; second is more about standard library, but still very good

Programming: Principles and Practice Using C++ (Bjarne Stroustrup) An introduction to programming using C++ by the creator of the language. A good read, that assumes no previous programming experience, but is not only for beginners.

† Not to be confused with C++ Primer Plus (Stephen Prata), with a significantly less favorable review.

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/388242/the-definitive-c-book-guide-and-list

Note: Thinking in C++ (Bruce Eckel) is also available as a free e-book
http://www.mindview.net/Books/TICPP/ThinkingInCPP2e.html



+1. I did not know that C++ primer Plus got less favorable reviews, thanks for the heads up!
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I'm taking my first class ever on C++ and our text book is "Starting Out With Games and Graphics in C++" by Tony Gaddis (2nd Edition). The first half of the book goes over all the basics that a beginner needs to know and the last half gets into the gaming aspect of it all. We haven't got to the games yet, but I think it a great start.
My favorite is beginning visual c++ 2012 ivor horton . Just google it and I am sure you will find a pdf. Its more for GUI developing, like applications and stuff. Im learning from it and im 13 and on chaper 6 or 7. He makes it really easy and fun.
closed account (3qX21hU5)
I can also vouch for Accelerated C++ and C++ Primer. I used both when I was first learning, read Accelerated C++ from start to finish and cross referenced the C++ primer on stuff that I didn't understand fully or that there wasn't enough information on. The authors are amazingly clear and obviously know what they are talking about so you don't need to worry if you are learning it the wrong way or picking up back habits.
I would'nt use C++ Primer on it's own as it's more of a reference book than a tutorial book.
But i think once you have learnt the basic's of C++, C++ Primer would be an essential purchase. This is my 5th computer language, And the learning curve is quite high only using C++ Primer as there are very few program example's.
I would not advice "Programming: Principles and Practice Using C++" by Bjarne Stroustrup for beginners. In my opinion it is the worst book for beginners. It is not a book on C++. It is a book "around C++". A beginner will spend much time to read such a big book but his knowledge of C++ will be close to zero. From the methodical point of view it is wriiten badly. For example new topics are accompanied by code examples that contain errors. This only confuses a beginner.
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I'm a beginer too. i just bought C++ primer plus and C++ primer.
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