Terraforming Mars

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There's evidence of it previously having a good atmosphere.
@xerzi
As there is no guarantee it would work. It costs a billion alone to launch a space shuttle. Can only imagine the cost of sending anything of significant mass to Mars.


to give you an idea, its around 10,000 per pound of payload to send something into orbit. thats not counting to mars.

a space "elevator" would be the best way to get things up there. but that is years away from being truly possible
Space elevators are impossible IMO because they would collapse once they reach a certain height.
closed account (o1vk4iN6)
This is coming from the guy who thinks terraforming Mars is possible :P. The structure wouldn't be free standing, it'd be a loose cable with a counterweight in space holding the other end.
You're implying space has gravity?

We'd need to make some sort of anti-gravity system.
Everything has a gravity, even space. It just is so minute that we appear weightless. Also, if it was possible to terraform Mars, the air would be thin, like that of climbing to the top of Mount Everest. You would be able to breath, but it is theorized that you would feel winded and tired.
You're implying space has gravity?


Gravity isn't the only force in play. If you twirl around holding a rope with a counterweight on the opposite end, what happens?
Thanks for clarifying that cire, I didn't even think about that. Same to you BHX.

Once you get used to it, wouldn't you feel better?
closed account (o1vk4iN6)
Everything has a gravity, even space. It just is so minute that we appear weightless.


What do you mean by that, so if I am in a space station I appear weightless because there is very little gravity ?
everything with mass has its own gravity, i actually own a physicist if you want me to send him here
xerzi wrote:
What do you mean by that, so if I am in a space station I appear weightless because there is very little gravity ?

Yes. Don't forget there is a plane that is able to simulate weightless for a few seconds. Same with an elevator plummeting from the top floor to the bottom floor, you would feel weightless until you hit the bottom.

Well gravity, and a few other forces (stress and strain) put on the body from things like the ground, chairs, beds, etc.


Zero-g is subtly different from the complete absence of gravity, something which is impossible due to the presence of gravity everywhere in the universe.
BHXSpecter wrote:
Also, if it was possible to terraform Mars, the air would be thin, like that of climbing to the top of Mount Everest. You would be able to breath, but it is theorized that you would feel winded and tired.

I wonder if that would be counteracted by the smaller gravity, since you wouldn't need to exert much force to move and so you wouldn't need as much oxygen.
We would need some kind of gravity stimulator so we can make sure we wont mutate into martians or something.

(Well another upside to colonizing Mars is they can't rebel because we can send people there and they can't do the same.)
xerzi wrote:
What do you mean by that, so if I am in a space station I appear weightless because there is very little gravity ?
This is a misnomer. There is almost as much gravitational pull at the international space station as there is on Earth's surface. The reason you would feel weightless in a space station is because of the orbit it's in around the earth. It has just the right amount of tangential velocity such that it's always in free fall, and thus, everyone in it is also in free fall. Which is the same reason that you can simulate weightlessness in planes by flying in an upside down parabolic shape.

Fredbill30 wrote:
We would need some kind of gravity stimulator
They already have machines that use centripetal force to simulate Earth's gravity in space. (You lay down and it spins you around at a certain speed).
Interestingly, it would be possible to recreate earths gravity in a space station by having the station spin on its axis at a certain speed (depending on its radius). Docking ships would be a nightmare, though.
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If mars is terraformed then we wouldn't need a space station.

So people would need to spend a certain amount of time in a gravity chamber to have bones strong enough to visit Earth.
Steps to teraforming mars:

1) Go to Holly wood.
2) Find the Man of Steel building.
3) Repair the terraforming machine.
4) Send the terraforming machine to mars.
5) Initiate the terraforming process.
6) Send Fred to mars (alone).
My point being that simulation gravitational force is very much possible.

I don't think there would be much visitation between the two, though. It's a solid 9-month trip that can only be made at very specific times because they are orbiting at different rates around the Sun -- Earth becomes closest to mars approximately once every two years.
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closed account (o1vk4iN6)
Yes. Don't forget there is a plane that is able to simulate weightless for a few seconds. Same with an elevator plummeting from the top floor to the bottom floor, you would feel weightless until you hit the bottom.

Well gravity, and a few other forces (stress and strain) put on the body from things like the ground, chairs, beds, etc.


That's not true, there's proof in the sky, look at the moon. If you need little gravity to feel weightless then there wouldn't be a giant moon orbiting our planet cause there wouldn't be enough gravity to keep it in orbit. You don't feel weightless cause there is no gravity on the plane, otherwise you wouldn't be falling towards the earth. Think of throwing 2 balls into the air at the same rate, in retrospect to one another they appear to be floating and weightless.

@thumper
His wording was weird and I wanted to confirm that there was an actual planet with gravity in play.
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The less gravity you have the lighter you. Then remove friction (stress and strain) and you get weightlessness. Gravity determines how short term or long term your weightlessness is. The more gravity the quicker you are pulled to the ground. The removal of friction is key, but gravitational pull plays a factor too.
closed account (o1vk4iN6)
You are just saying random stuff now that is true in it's own accord. Yes if you are on a planet with less gravity your weight will be less and the sky is blue but that doesn't really have any relevance here. All gravity is is a force and weight is simply a vector. You are trying to put too much meaning for gravity on weight. If you were to stand on a scale in an elevator and it started to move really fast upward your weight would be greater.
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