Cobol

Hello everyone,
I have just learned that my mom knows cobol. I suggest her to resume coding but she said me that " I haven't code for over than 10 years.".
Here is my question:
What can you do with cobol or is cobol a usefull language? If so do you suggest my mom to resume?
It's an old language. Used in a lot of mainframes (which are old themselves). It's definitely useful for legacy systems, but I can't imagine anything new is ever made with it.

Why do you want her back into programming so bad? Maybe she didn't like it.
She always says "I'm bored.". Coding might be a hobby for her.
Hey, I don't really know for sure, but I think you can get paid pretty handsomely if you know how to maintain those old systems running Cobol. There's plenty of new stuff being written Cobol too... (It isn't as dead a language as many people would like to believe.)

http://www.itworld.com/career/341879/cobol-will-outlive-us-all

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/COBOL#External_links

I thought it was only used in robots?
Fredbill30 wrote:
I thought it was only used in robots?


Har Har, that really made me laugh !

There are a number of entire corporate enterprise level business software packages written in COBOL.

Now that you can read Duoas' post (1 min before yours) - that will become clear.

One observation I would make is that a lot of people think that IT world is full of cutting edge technologies, but that is not entirely true.

There are lots companies that have lots of legacy stuff. I know of companies who STILL do new code directly in assembly & COBOL, others which use FORTRAN 77 on super computers because it produces less assembly than other languages.
I already know they still use assembly. (Why wouldn't they?)

I just thought COBOL was used in robots. I think you think I meant that they don't use COBOL at all...
Fredbill wrote:
I just thought COBOL was used in robots. I think you think I meant that they don't use COBOL at all...
Fredbill wrote:
I thought it was only used in robots?
TheIdeasMan wrote:


Fredbill wrote:
I just thought COBOL was used in robots. I think you think I meant that they don't use COBOL at all...
Fredbill wrote:
I thought it was only used in robots?



lol
Over the last few years I've heard from a number of professors and academic advisers in the Comp Sci and Information Systems departments in the schools around me that there are a number of companies in the area that will pay out the wazzoo for young developers proficient in Cobol (among other things) because those who maintain their archaic systems are a retiring breed. I guess once the cost of paying a new employee outweighs the cost of rebuilding the system that'll change, though.
closed account (iw0XoG1T)
These companies that need Cobol programmers to maintain their systems don't just need Cobol programmers they need programmers with knowledge of their systems.

That is why these companies are not hiring new Cobol programmers their problems are larger and more complicated than we need more programmers.

If you are working in an institution that has a system that needs to be maintained in Cobol--and you understand that system you are probably being paid a very handsome price. But just knowing a little Cobol is not enough.

The few Cobol programmers I know are not telling me that head-hunters are calling them. They seem to be willing to stay where they are until they retire.
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Thanks for replies but I cant find an answer to my question S:
So they don't use C?

Okay so I'm gonna have to learn Cobol, too.
senhor wrote:
Thanks for replies but I cant find an answer to my question S:


Well COBOL was used extensively in the past to do large business systems, and is still used to maintain those systems.

Your mother could resume if she wanted to (there may be other factors as to why she wouldn't), and potentially earn lots of money doing so.

Fredbil wrote:
So they don't use C?

Okay so I'm gonna have to learn Cobol, too.


A conclusion based on a generalised false assumption.

It is not that C isn't used - a wide variety of languages are used in business. Often it is a combination of languages & Data Base systems, and off the shelf software that make an entire solution.

It's not just business either, there is science, government & open source also.

In short there is a whole spectrum of organisations, with a variety of needs, a variety of solutions, using a variety of tools.

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