Should I give up on C++?

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I don't know, should I? I think I might. With C++ it seems like I'll have a well planned out program and logically I know what I want to do. But when I start making the program; I'm spending 5 hours trying to figure out "Why doesn't C++ understand something that is perfectly logical?".

It's just confusing and the littlest thing can mess up your whole program.

So should I quit? Or can someone recommend me an easier language to deal with, that's not as much as a headache?
closed account (Dy7SLyTq)
no you shouldnt. you just have a bug. but if you really want to quit, python or php
I'm spending 5 hours trying to figure out "Why doesn't C++ understand something that is perfectly logical?".


This is not C++, but is programming in general. There is not a programming language in the world that reads your mind. You either write your code so the compiler/interpretter understands it... or it doesn't work.

The problem is that what you think is perfectly logical and what is perfectly logical are two different things.

As DTSCode is suggesting, maybe you just need to learn how to resolve errors/bugs and get more familiar with the syntax.

So should I quit?


I don't know what kind of advice you're looking for with this question. Whether or not you want to use C++ is entirely your decision. What anyone here thinks about what you do with your time is meaningless. Especially when we don't know anything about you or what you know.

Or can someone recommend me an easier language to deal with, that's not as much as a headache?


Scripting languages like Python are generally more forgiving... but in my experience it comes at a price of catching fewer mistakes at compile time and creating more runtime bugs that you have to sort out.
closed account (Dy7SLyTq)
catching fewer mistakes at compile time and creating more runtime bugs that you have to sort out.

nitpicking, but a compiler would catch most mistakes. i think you mean interpreter which will only catch one mistake at a time
no I mean logical mistakes. Code that is syntactically legal but doesn't do what you intended, resulting in runtime bugs.

EDIT: In particular... dynamic typed languages, and languages where you don't have to declare your variables up front (Python, PHP) have been a source of many headaches for me.
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closed account (Dy7SLyTq)
oh sorry my mistake.
@CPPNoob2013

Why don't you make use of this forum and ask questions about your problems?

You might find that once you get over some basic ideas, things will become a lot easier.

If you like post an example of code you had trouble with, there are plenty of people ready to help.

Hope all goes well.

NO YOU SHOULD NOT

Keep trying ....hwo could a programmer say such a thing....if u wanna be a programmer than dont but if u want to be something else than ur choice....

DO you know Chris Bosh he is a basketball player and a programmer ...he said i love programming as much as basketball...he said that i would have quit programming but i love it thats why

watch this http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nKIu9yen5nc
at 1:22
No.

When I first started I thought I was the best programmer in the world. I thought I could program and game in like 2 seconds because everyone else sucked compared to me. Kinda like you do when you first learn multiplication.

Then, I hit that phase when somethings where really were really messed up to me, and I had trouble moving on (This phase lasts like 1-2 weeks).

Eventually, you pass this phase, and once you do, many things become easier.

Don't quit because something is too hard. That just makes you a quitter.

Even when I program stuff for my game it gets fustrating (One time ONE little letter broke my whole program for a week until I saw the error). However, I just look into documentation for C++ and SDL, I Google some small errors I have, (thanks to Disch, I fixed a game-breaking bug) and I post here.

No matter what program you take on, you can look on YouTube for similar programs. Look at those, and source code, and you can get inspiration (And I don't mean plagiarism either)
closed account (Dy7SLyTq)
if you really want to know what debugging feels like: start programming in brainf*ck
@DTSCode: That language does not at all represent anything of what real world programming/debugging is like. =P
closed account (Dy7SLyTq)
i didnt say it represented real world languages
fred said:
(One time ONE little letter broke my whole program for a week until I saw the error)
and i was responding to it. it becomes harder to debug the bigger your program is because it has no error handling or warnings
ah. nm then. =)
It was with a sprite clip error. (The one that Disch was completely different.)

The resource side of my game doesn't need much error handling because it is handled in my resource manager.
Why would you quit? Just keep coding and practicing and you'll eventually get better. Generally, if you have an interest in programming (and are not doing it just for earning a living), your skills will come naturally.
Well he's 12 so I don't think he programs for money... I'm sure he just feels he isn't good enough- which isn't true. Even if you only know Hello World, you're much better than the other little kids our age who claim they are "133t h4x0rz".
closed account (S6k9GNh0)
I find that some people find it easier to do procedural programming and then move back into OOP-based programming. OOP-based programming can be confusing and often leads to over complications (when its main advantages are really just RAII and type-safety).

Procedural programming tends to be linear and easier to understand. Although, each person is different.
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computerquip wrote:
OOP-based programming can be confusing and often leads to over complications (when its main advantages are really just RAII and type-safety).


Watch what you say, you could just start a procedural programming v OOP debate. ;)
closed account (S6k9GNh0)
Nothing wrong with the advantage of OOP, just don't like how people abuse it. i.e. I don't like the ioDoom 3 style of interface!
Yea I know what you mean.

I recall a newbie making a class for 3 variables, and using the object one time in the program.
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