What is your favorite IDE

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closed account (owpE3TCk)
What is your favorite IDE? Mine is Code::Blocks.
closed account (jwkNwA7f)
MSVS. Especially 2012 and 2013, when it comes out. I also like Xcode for OS X.
Visual Studio 2010.
Dev-c++
Kate.
Kate?
QtCreator
closed account (owpE3TCk)
@ResidentBiscuit I've never heard of Kate before.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kate_(text_editor)

PS: I write all my code in basic text editors; those without syntax highlighting.
It makes it much more interesting when code folding, highlighting, and colors are added when viewed on other programs that parse it. :P
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Text editors aren't really IDEs.
Some text editors support adequate plugin software that can include compilers, linkers, and toolchains altogether.

Even if not, you can manually compile the file without a toolchain, tools, etc. just from a plain .cpp file.
Some text editors support adequate plugin software that can include compilers, linkers, and toolchains altogether.


My point is that a text editor is merely one component of an IDE. You can keep adding components (in the form of plugins) onto a text editor and eventually build something that functions as an IDE... but the text editor by itself is not an IDE.

Therefore... saying "Kate is my favorite IDE" is a little bonkers because Kate isn't an IDE. A more reasonable answer would have been "Kate with X, Y, Z, Q plugins is my favorite IDE".

Even if not, you can manually compile the file without a toolchain, tools, etc. just from a plain .cpp file.


Yes.... but then you're not using an IDE. You're just using a text editor and compiling manually.



I don't know if there's a formal definition of exactly what qualifies as an IDE or not... but I think that when most reasonable people talk about IDEs they're referring to something that has at least a few basic features:

1) A "code aware" text editor that includes at the very least some kind of syntax highlighting, but often also additional perks such as code completion, intellisense, etc.

2) Able to have multiple files open in the same context at once.

3) Has a concept of your entire program as a whole, rather than just the individual components. Whether that be through a project file, makefile or other means.

4) Has an interface with the build tools to where they can be easily invoked through the UI.

5) Integrated debugger.



Many text editors like Kate/Notepad++/etc can be pumped up with addons to fulfill several of these... but I don't think any of them fulfill all of them. Which is why they're not considered IDEs (at least not by anyone who actually uses IDEs).
closed account (1yR4jE8b)
Netbeans for me, with XCode as a close second. I use QtCreator/Designer when I make GUIs but don't really like the actual C++ IDE part.

Once Jetbrains releases their C++ IDE, I'll probably use that exclusively -- I already use IntelliJ Idea for Java, HTML/CSS/Javascript, Ruby, Python, Scala as well as AppCode for iOS/Cocoa development.

When I work remotely on Linux Machines, I use Vim with a bunch of plugins and CTags. Some hardcore linux developers would call that the "IDE". I know one person in particular who considers his entire Linux OS X as his "IDE" -- I wouldn't go that far.
1) A "code aware" text editor that includes at the very least some kind of syntax highlighting, but often also additional perks such as code completion, intellisense, etc.


Kate has syntax highlighting and intellisense (maybe not the level of VS).

2) Able to have multiple files open in the same context at once.


Kate has this.

3) Has a concept of your entire program as a whole, rather than just the individual components. Whether that be through a project file, makefile or other means.


http://kate-editor.org/2012/11/02/using-the-projects-plugin-in-kate/

Last two...
Has a built in terminal interface, to me that's just as good. It also has a basic GDB plugin.
http://kate-editor.org/2010/10/06/introducing-kate-gdb-plugin/

So, yea the big features are from plugins, but these are all plugins that come with a standard kate install. I would argue that kate be considered a basic IDE. It has project awareness (if set up), intellisense, syntax highlighting, auto-indent, brace matching, built in terminal (IMO more useful than only having UI buttons for building).

But take my opinion lightly, I have no professional experience :)
but these are all plugins that come with a standard kate install.


Ah. In that case I withdraw my earlier comment.

C++ seems to be spoiled with a large variety of IDE's in comparison to some languages. I.e while I typically write C++ code within an IDE I actually just use Notepad++ for Lua, as there isn't much of anything for Lua as far as IDE's go.
I've been using code::blocks and I have no complaints.

I found out yesterday that I'll be using QT and codelite in my C++ course at University.
Not really an IDE, but I only use Vim
^ +1 I don't know if it's you, Cheraphy, who usually posts this in IDE threads, but the first time I read it I was very grateful for it. It took me a while to get comfortable with all the tools, but I feel I have a better understanding of everything now. That's the way I like to learn things anyway. On the other hand I can see people preferring all these tools packaged in one toolset, but then we're back to personal preference. :)

NwN
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