Anyone into Game Programming as a profession?

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Is it just me, or does Unity cost money? Are there not better solutions out there that are free/cheaper? Not to mention you need Unity player to play those games.
Oh no, I have a feeling that I'm about to advertise an engine I hate. Unity has a free version that has a few "advanced" features stripped out.
you need Unity player to play those games.
no, Unity can build native executables for Windows, MacOS, Linux, iDevices, Android, Blackberry as well as the webplayer(which needs you to have the web player). There is also paid support for XBox360, PS3 and Wii.
I write a to-do list, and get a little done everyday.

I cross off when I finish the part, right now skeletal animation is on my mind.
there's people who want to do games programming on my course, im going into computer science instead, Im more likley to go into games programming than they are but they (if in the unlikely event they successfully get a job in the games industry) may get to do more design.
@devonrevenge
The degree has practically no bearing on if you get into the industry or not. Jason Rubin, formerly of Naughty Dog (Crash Bandicoot), was telling me one day that most of the guys in ND didn't have a degree and a few didn't even have a high school diploma. The game industry is probably the only industry that really doesn't care about degree, or education and only puts that on their sites to make it so people are scared away from applying. Truth is, so long as you can prove you are a capable programmer/artist/writer/etc. you have a chance of being hired.

Truthfully, degrees only tell employers that you met the set requirements for the degree. Your grades tell them you at least turned in all your work and did what you were supposed to. The interview tests they give is to show you are capable of problem solving and programming.

Diploma: a certificate awarded by an educational establishment to show that someone has successfully completed a course of study.

Degree: an award conferred by a college or university signifying that the recipient has satisfactorily completed a course of study
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Oh yeah great point, that's why Im taking advantage of being at uni, cos if I wasn't at uni I couldn't practice enough to be kick ass at the interview when it comes to an interview, I just got's to be really good at programming.

A lot of my fellow students don't get it, they are watching breaking bad during lectures and doing minimal amounts of work, my lecturer is giving me challenges, he recons he can get a paper out of me and another keen coder by year 2!
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I still fail to understand why you're calling college a "uni".

At the end of the day those in your class will be just as qualified as you are, so you shouldn't go overboard. (Well that's what I do in school anyway. I slack mostly and get just high enough grades for honors. Going overboard is just a waste of time)
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I still fail to understand why you're calling college a "uni".
short for "University".
Lumpkin wrote:
At the end of the day those in your class will be just as qualified as you are, so you shouldn't go overboard.

Not even close. You and your classmates are only as qualified as the effort you put into your craft. Just taking a course or two doesn't make a person qualified.
Oh, I didn't know that.

Just ignore that post.
Well, qualified in the sense that you all walk away with the same piece of paper. Not to be confused with walking away with the same knowledge and skill.
Well that's what I meant. I'm guessing the prof writes notes on their report cards or whatever.
Well as far as I know the college can only tell the employer if you do in fact have the degree. You can ask some instructors to write you a letter of recommendation, but otherwise college is nothing like high school.
closed account (o1vk4iN6)
Well that's what I meant. I'm guessing the prof writes notes on their report cards or whatever.


Profs have better things to do than write notes for the sometimes 400+ students they have in a single class. I doubt any university even gives grades through use of a physical copy.
BHXSpecter wrote:
as far as I know the college can only tell the employer if you do in fact have the degree

Idk how it works in America, but in the UK, you get grades on degrees. The highest is called a first (from first class, I guess) and corresponds to an A grade, and then there's a 2.1 or a 2.2 (pronounced as "two-one" or "two-two") which correspond to a B or a C. I believe those are the only passing grades.

xerzi wrote:
Profs have better things to do than write notes for the sometimes 400+ students they have in a single class. I doubt any university even gives grades through use of a physical copy.

Mine does. You submit physical coursework by putting it in a box which then gets emptied every couple of hours by the school office. They then sort it and give it to the professor who is marking it. The professor then returns it with a brief comment after about two weeks and the student can pick it up. Some coursework is submitted electronically, though, in which case you get the grade electronically and without any notes.
@chrisname
In the US you get just the degree, no grades. You go two years for an Associates degree, four years for a Bachelor's Degree, six years for a Masters, and eight plus years for a PhD in your field (I think I have the estimated years right). The grades are only to let the instructor/professor get an idea of your understanding of the course material so that the ones that care about the students can help them catch on. At the end of the course the grade A, B, C, or D just says you get the credits for the course and F means you have to take it over. The grades also figure into your GPA, but that isn't really factual because I got almost nothing but As and Bs in my course, but have a GPA of like 2.7 just because I had issues with Discrete Math, Physics, and Psychology.
closed account (o1vk4iN6)
Mine does. You submit physical coursework by putting it in a box which then gets emptied every couple of hours by the school office. They then sort it and give it to the professor who is marking it. The professor then returns it with a brief comment after about two weeks and the student can pick it up. Some coursework is submitted electronically, though, in which case you get the grade electronically and without any notes.


Well they probably aren't teaching 400+ student then are they ;P.
xerzi wrote:
Well they probably aren't teaching 400+ student then are they ;P.
Wikipedia wrote:
The University of Brighton is a UK university of over 21,000 students and 2,500 staff based on five campuses in Brighton, Eastbourne and Hastings on the south coast of England.


I don't know how other schools work, but the School of Computing, Engineering and Mathematics does it the way I described, and I imagine it has a bit more than 400 students. Computer science is a relatively small course (being that the university started out as an art school) but there are about six different computing courses, plus the various kinds of engineering they teach, and then mathematics, statistics, etc.
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closed account (o1vk4iN6)
Stats for the whole university vs. your department and the number of students in a single course taught by a single prof aren't really the same. I have some classes with only 3 people in it, the prof usually marks it themselves then and usually puts a lot of detail in it as they tend to be harder classes.
over 21,000 students and 2,500 staff


Are only ~3% of staff teaching?
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