Things like this is why I am starting to hate windows

Pages: 123
DSTCode wrote:
im dual booting ubuntu 12.04 lts and windows 7 and use linux way more. thats because i like developing on linux better (im so original and not to say developing on windows is bad, i just dont like it) and with vlc i now have media software that works. the only reason why i keep windows is for the occasional gaming session and someday i might want to get into c#, f#, .net etc but ill use virtual box for that


Was it not less than 2 months ago you said the complete opposite as we debated windows/linux?
Last edited on
closed account (3qX21hU5)
Surely you have an HDD aside the SSD. If so, I don't see the problem with having 60 GiB reserved for paging and hibernation (that's actually an excellent way to use SSDs). If not, I question the logic of putting 32 GiB of RAM on a computer with only four times as much storage. Seems rather unbalanced.


Ya I do but was gearing up to install a few games on the SSD and didn't have enough space to fit them both on it which is why I noticed it. Personally I would rather have my games on the SSD then having paging and hibernation (I never use hibernation anyways so it would be a waste).

Though I looked into a bit more and seems like it doesn't need to be on the same drive as the OS so just moved it to the HDD instead.

Why not get more storage? I don't know how you cope in the modern age with 120GB of space! Not to mention, hardrives are fairly cheap these days.


Never said I only have 120GB of space ;) I actually have quite a bit more then that it's just I only have that one drive that is a SSD so I tend to try and not have stuff on it I don't want.
LB wrote:
- Windows is not the primary development environment for most other programmers
- Most other programmers have access to other operating systems than Windows
- I keep trying to compile libraries and software on Windows
- Most other programmers don't design libraries and software to compile on Windows

Stuff like this is why I don't use Windows as my primary OS. It seems likely that if other developers are using something other than Windows as a development environment, the thing they're using is worth checking out. Personally, I hate coding on Windows. There are almost no decent free editors (Notepad++ is the only one that comes close, but I find it annoying to use; Sublime Text is nearly perfect but it's not free) and absolutely no good terminal emulators. I don't really like using IDEs either because most of them make it annoying or difficult to structure your source files the way you want to (here's looking at you, CodeBlocks) and I often find their editors are inferior to gedit.
@Mats: It's a SSD.
SSD are really fast, compared to the regular HDD's.
That's why, "in these days", he "only" has 120gb.
Last edited on
Kate is by far the best *nix text editor out there ;)

@LB, Have you tried using VMWarePlayer? There's a free version that works great, it's what I use on my work computer. Have VMs for Ubuntu, Fedora, and Debian. They all work with no issues. Might be worth a shot. Or you could just dual boot ;) I give my Linux boot 50GB of space, and it's never even come close to using that much. I give my VMs 30GB, and they use maybe half of it, but those are loaded up with a ton of documents and software for work.
closed account (o1vk4iN6)
Sublime Text is nearly perfect but it's not free


There is a evaluation copy that has no time restraint, i'm not sure if they even specify that it can't be used for commercial use. Though it only costs $70 (was $50 or something before sublime text 3).

I don't really like using IDEs either because most of them make it annoying or difficult to structure your source files


Visual Studio is probably the exception here, it has a lot of settings and it is easy to customize your folder layout. Probably one of only two microsoft products i actually like but there are still small hiccups with it mostly with the compiler.
Last edited on
@chrisname: I am in the dark, enlighten me about good editors on other OSes and show me screenshots - I want to see what you're talking about that makes my Windows editors and IDEs seem so useless. (Hint: I have a burning dislike for console editors or anything that requires memorizing keyboard shortcuts)
This i the kind of thread that happens every month and I always state this:

For programmers there is Linux, for games there is Windows(and soon the SteamBOX that is going to run linux, so muhahaha), and for artworkers there is Mac OSX


If you disagree with me that's just fine because this is my opinion. It doesn't have to be anyone elses
Last edited on
closed account (Dy7SLyTq)
Was it not less than 2 months ago you said the complete opposite as we debated windows/linux?

actually no, but you were so convinced you were right because you were older than me you didnt stop to actually read what i said.
if you are referencing an argument i got into with fredbill30 way back when, i said i had gamed on linux, but now I just want to use it primarily for development. in the argument we got in, you said linux was the best operating system. you then proceeded to give a long list of reasons why. i read through about a little over half way, realized each of those reasons was wrong, and then proceeded to tell you why. i will give you that i assumed it was all wrong, because as i said, after getting through a good portion and being able to count on one hand the number of things you got right. You then threw my reasons out the window and attacked my age. And im not being hipocritical here, because I am a huge linux/android lover, but i dont believe in false advertising
Last edited on
ResidentBiscuit wrote:
Kate is by far the best *nix text editor out there ;)
LB wrote:
enlighten me about good editors on other OSes

I use gedit. It has a simple interface, a reasonable number of features built-in (including find-and-replace that allows escape characters, something that seems to be missing from a lot of editors), uses sane hotkeys (which Notepad "Ctrl+D duplicates the current line" ++ should learn from) and is easily extensible with Python plugins.

I did use Kate for a while and, as I remember, I knew I would have come to like it if I had spent the time to


LB wrote:
show me screenshots

You'll have to find screenshots on Google because I only have access to Windows right now because I'm on my laptop after my desktop's PSU died yesterday. ResidentBiscuit mentioned the only graphical editor besides gedit that I've actually used (except for a gedit 2.x fork called pluma, but gedit 3.x is better).

There is also a cross-platform editor called jedit which is quite good, but for some reason I still don't like it.

You can actually get gedit on Windows, but it's an old version and it's also broken - the main one is that if you try to open multiple files from the shell, it will open them in individual processes, and if you try to open more files from the shell while it's running, they also get opened in individual processes. The only ways to get all your files loaded in one window are to drag them from the shell onto the window, or to open them one-by-one from within gedit. So, yeah, don't bother with it on Windows.

xerzi wrote:
There is a evaluation copy that has no time restraint, i'm not sure if they even specify that it can't be used for commercial use. Though it only costs $70 (was $50 or something before sublime text 3).

Is the evaluation copy not crippleware? Also $70 is a lot to someone who currently can only spend about $50 per week after food, bills, rent, etc. Being a student is great, but I really, really need to get a job :P
closed account (S6k9GNh0)
xerzi, it is not cripple ware. Really the only restraint is that it pops up every few attempts to save that you need to buy the software.

I unfortunately cannot justify buying the software for the price its at. Maybe if it were more affordable, then I would gladly buy it but it has little extra over free alternatives.
@chrisname: Notepad++ has Ctrl+D and escaped find and replace, and most IDEs I have used have escaped find and replace support and a way to duplicate the line with a keyboard shortcut. I don't know about plugin-based extensibility, though, because most IDEs I use by default have more features than I want.

And I drag files into my editors all the time, it's the fastest way to open the file I am interested in. I even drag files into the console to autotype their exact path, works very well with Cygwin to make cygwin paths with ease.

I saw some screenshots and as expected it's hard to tell it apart from the ones I use - text editors have homed in on the ideal designs already and they are all looking pretty similar right now.

@chrisname#sublime-text: It's not crippleware, it's full version afaik. No idea about the legality of using it, because it's all just text...
@LB
The reason I like gedit so much could be largely because I'm so used to it.

And I drag files into my editors all the time, it's the fastest way to open the file I am interested in

Yes, but if the editor isn't open and you highlight a bunch of files in the shell and hit enter, gedit for Windows will open each one in a separate window (and, I think, process), regardless of whether there's any process running already or not. I think the reason may be to do with a lack of IPC. I don't understand why they would have left that out, though - it's not hard to implement, and for an editor, you most often want only one window/process (and if you want more than one, gedit lets you move tabs to a new window or between existing windows anyway).
Last edited on
In Windows, IPC is done via DDE to e.g. communicate with an existing process that it needs to open a file. I don't know how hard it is to implement but maybe it is a pain. The other 'less elegant' alternative is to actually open a separate process that just communicates with any existing processes and then exits.
Last edited on
LB wrote:
The other 'less elegant' alternative is to actually open a separate process that just communicates with any existing processes and then exits.

That's what I would have done, and I had assumed that gedit did that on Linux so I didn't understand why it doesn't work on Windows. Maybe it does something Linux-specific instead...
I'd assume that to make porting easier they just disabled non-essential code :\
Visual C++ is a decent IDE for Windows chrisname.
I thought he already explained his reasons for not liking VC++?
Whoops, overlooked that.
@Lumpkin, I used to think that too...
Now that I got used to Codelite and MinGW, I'm quite thinking the opposite.
Quoting someone else, VC++'s best thing are the debug features.
Pages: 123