Avoid confusion: use adjectives!

() round parenthesis
[] square brackets   
{} curly braces         
<> angle chevrons    


Now there can be no debate about brackets vs braces vs parens etc. because you describe what they look like and use a different name for each.
Are there other shapes for parenthesis? ;)

Joking aside, parenthesis, brackets, and braces is what I call the top three, but I wouldn't call the greater than, less than brackets a chevron because when I think of chevrons I think of the military insignia that are v-shaped.
I make a point to always put the name itself in the brackets in question.

Like.... "variable scope is determined by the surrounding {braces}". "You use [brackets] to index an array", etc.

Parenthesis is the only time I don't really make a point to do that... because nobody gets confused when you say parenthesis.

BHX wrote:
because when I think of chevrons I think of the military insignia that are v-shaped.


I don't think of any shape. I just think of the gas station.
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Disch wrote:
I don't think of any shape. I just think of the gas station.

Forgot about the gas station. Though I didn't think of the police, but this is an image from custom patches. The bottom two rows of patches are police and military:
http://www.pfpettibone.com/images/Chevrons/CustomChevrons.jpg
Chevrons are also used on road warning signs (which you don't legally have to observe). </rebel-mechanic-by-trade>

*Link: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Warning_sign#Chevrons_and_arrows

Guess this post wasn't very contributive to the original post in the topic. Good thing I have 20/20 hindsight to see things like this.

http://southpark.wikia.com/wiki/Captain_Hindsight to the rescue
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Brace and bracket both loosely mean "pair", and as far as I'm aware nobody says parentheses other than Americans, note this is not in offense, just saying that I think most just call them "brackets".

This is how I'd say them because honestly I really don't like how you've mixed bracket/brace/parentheses when they're all the same.

() Bracket
[] Square Bracket
{} Curly Bracket
<> Triangle Bracket


Don't bother about chevrons or parentheses... They're all have the same meaning but here is just describing the shape.

Disch wrote:
because nobody gets confused when you say parenthesis
Well I don't think you can say that because honestly I didn't know what they where until I saw one C tutorial on youtube and noticed he was typing brackets on screen while saying parentheses.
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> Don't bother about chevrons or parentheses

Parenthesis is the term used in the English version of the IS. Left parenthesis and right parenthesis are part of the basic source character set of the language.

'Angle chevrons' won't make sense to most C++ programmers. Chevrons are not part of the basic source character set of the language. (Angle brackets use the less-than and greater-than symbols).

These are the terms used in the IS (English):

Square bracket [left square bracket, right square bracket]
Subscripting: A postfix expression followed by an expression in square brackets is a postfix expression.


Brace {opening brace, closing brace}
The point of declaration for an injected-class-name s immediately following the opening brace of the class definition.


Parenthesis (left parenthesis, right parenthesis)
sub-expression : a subset of a regular expression that has been marked by parenthesis.


Angle bracket <less-than symbol, greater-than symbol>
The template parameters are specified in the angle bracket enclosed list that immediately follows the keyword template.
Parenthesis is the term used in the English version of the IS.

This being the IS for C right? Wasn't that basically created by the US?
Although it's an international standard the documentation is in US English?

Most of this is just an educated assumption, if I'm wrong then please link me to the origin of the documentation so I can be corrected.
> This being the IS for C right?

injected-class-name, regular expression, template parameters?

> international standard the documentation is in US English?

Language - the official languages of ISO are English, French and Russian. ISO International Standards and standards-type documents published by the Central Secretariat are usually in separate (monolingual) English (en) and French (fr) editions and, less frequently, in Russian (ru).
http://www.iso.org/iso/iso_catalogue/how_to_use_the_catalogue.htm

AFAIK, ISO does not make any distinction between dialects of a particular language. A trailing (E), (F) or (R) after the reference number is the indicator of the language: for instance, ISO/IEC 14882:2011(E) is the C++ standard in English.

With parentheses meaning (), there doesn't seem to be any difference between International English and American English usage.
parenthesis (parentheses): a pair of round brackets ( ) used to mark off a parenthetical word or phrase - Oxford English Dictionary
parenthesis (usually parentheses): a pair of round brackets ( ) used to mark off a parenthetical word or phrase. - Oxford American English Dictionary


In the earlier quote from IS, "marked by parenthesis" instead of "marked by parentheses", is American, but that's about it.

I agree that there are Americanisms in the IS, but none that is too hard to figure out - for instance, the persistent use of 'alternate' where 'alternative' would have been appropriate.
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