A funny dose of reality...

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@Duoas,

I do agree with your rant about noobs not using code tags, but in their (partial) defense message preview doesn't work when creating a new post. If that was fixed it might encourage some noobs to properly format their source.

TheIdeasMan wrote:
Could it be possible to force a new user to read the tags article before they get to do their first post? Or maybe a short animation even?

And how many users actually read the manual, or the EULA? Most people just click their way through all the annoying and boring message boxes so they can use the program/play the game.

Everyone was a noob at one time. Most learn to help us to help them by formatting their code.

When someone doesn't want to use code tags, even after being politely asked multiple times, then I don't bother assisting them.
And that is their defense -- and a valid one, at that: they are noobs, and don't really know any better.

As someone said on the last page, the best way is simply to have as many unobtrusive hints to help the newb as possible. Which is why I advocated for the current setup with the current text.

It's there, and some people do, in fact, read it. There will always be those who don't, and simply click and paste it away.

It is when people refuse to correct their behavior that it becomes obvious that they don't really care for our time and effort, and it becomes safe to ignore them.

I optimistically believe that most posters here really do want actual help.
FurryGuy wrote:
And how many users actually read the manual, or the EULA? Most people just click their way through all the annoying and boring message boxes so they can use the program/play the game.


But that gets back to my original point, if only a small percentage read something and take notice of it, then we have achieved something albeit very small. A bunch of small achievements might add up to something, so I was saying to perhaps not dismiss such suggestions.

The colour of this website is mostly blue or grey (with some spots of other colours) , I reckon this might be a factor in people not noticing things.
As someone said on the last page, the best way is simply to have as many unobtrusive hints to help the newb as possible.
Javascript + helpful hints for users with low post count can help:
"Your post seems to contain code. Consider placing it inside code tags. Learn more"
"Post title containing single word 'Help' or 'Problem' isn't going to get attention. Consider changing it to more descriptive title"
"It looks like you are trying to answer your own topic soon after creating it. Post with answers are likely to be overlooked by people who would think that poster already getting help. Consider editing your original post"

And how many users actually read the manual, or the EULA? Most people just click their way through all the annoying and boring message boxes so they can use the program/play the game.
I am a huge jerk, so once I made a forum dedicated to translating a book series. Forum rules were presented in editable box and contained several randomly generated errors. To finish registration you were required to fix them.
MiiNiPaa wrote:
I am a huge jerk, so once I made a forum dedicated to translating a book series. Forum rules were presented in editable box and contained several randomly generated errors. To finish registration you were required to fix them.
https://xkcd.com/810/
You know what else I can't stand?

"It doesn't work."


Yeah, well, I've compiled your code with my modification and it does exactly what you've asked for it to do.

If it doesn't work, the problem lies between you and your own keyboard.



/end rant
> it does exactly what you've asked for it to do.
it does what you understood were the requirements.


I hate «It doesn't work» because it provides zero information to work with.
> it does what you understood where the requirements.

Sorry, I should clarify. I'm talking about situations where the user's requirements are pretty black and write.

I just responded over at SO, where OP complained he was trying to add a struct to a set that contained two integers (an integer pair, as it were), and he wanted (0 1) and (1 0) to compare equal, but his algorithm wasn't working.

I showed him how to implement a default comparator that first sorted the elements before comparing them. Hence, (1 0) compares as (0 1).

He claimed that all he did was replace his comparator with mine and "it didn't work".

I think there's something else going on.

[edit] Looking at it again today, OP selected my answer as correct, so he must have figured out what was wrong...
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Duoas wrote:
Yeah, well, I've compiled your code with my modification and it does exactly what you've asked for it to do.

If it doesn't work, the problem lies between you and your own keyboard.


Short between operator's ears.
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