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The Rise of Microsoft Visual Studio Code

Visual Studio Code usage is rising rapidly! VS Code is now the editor chosen by the majority of engineers during programming interviews, and it appears to be rapidly taking market share from other top editors.

https://triplebyte.com/blog/editor-report-the-rise-of-visual-studio-code
However,
First, notice the preeminence of Emacs and Vim! Engineers who use these editors pass our interview at significantly higher rates than other engineers.
Interesting, but not what I expected.

I tried VS Code for a while, around when it was released, on Linux, and I couldn't stand it -- it was way too slow. Maybe it has improved, or is better on Windows, but I'm not likely to try it again in the near future.

Maybe it was busy stealing my data. Waiting on the network or something.

Engineers who use [Emacs and Vim] pass our interview at significantly higher rates than other engineers

Given that Triplebyte is a recruiter, that data probably isn't a representative sample of developers. I agree with the conclusion that it's probably an experience thing - Vim and Emacs users are "more experienced" in general?
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Vim and Emacs users are "more experienced" in general?

If you start today, what editor might you use? I bet vi ain't on the top of choices.

Would you use something else for years and only lately pick up vi?

If you did start 30-40 years ago, what editors did you use? Vi seems possible. You could have kept using it, or move to something else.

Yes, there is plausible correlation between long experience and usage of {Vim|Emacs}, but no causality.
Well, it's not merely correlation. There is a causal relationship. "Long experience" and "vi/emacs usage" share a common cause of "having started working within a specific range of dates". At least according to that interpretation.
I bet vi ain't on the top of choices.

No. Well, Vi is different from Vim. Vim is more viable, although if I was brand new I wouldn't touch either of them with a 10-foot pole. I've seen first-hand beginners who can't figure out how to close the damn thing!

If you start today, what editor might you use?

I might use whatever editor my book/tutorial/professor/etc. told me to use, or with no guidance, I guess I'd choose something popular. VS Code, maybe.

The first language I studied in-depth was Common Lisp - I had only played around before that. Emacs was (and is) completely dominant in that area, just as PyCharm is completely dominant as a Python editor, and Visual Studio is dominant in C# development. So I picked up Emacs as a beginner.

Yes, there is plausible correlation between long experience and usage of {Vim|Emacs}, but no causality.
Agreed.
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What's better Visual Code or Visual Studio and why?
What's better Visual Code or Visual Studio and why?

Neither, because the fitness of one or the other is a matter of personal taste.

Whatever works to make the individual programmer better at creating, revising and debugging code, that is the best to use.

I've tried Visual Code, but after all the time and effort I've expended in tweaking Visual Studio to let me code and not constantly fight the interface, I prefer VS.

My preferences wouldn't stop me from using VC if it offered what I considered worthwhile features not found in other IDEs. I use two different IDEs with different underlying compilers in an attempt to make my C++ code as agnostic and portable as possible. I am beginning to learn how to compile and debug code at the command line level. *OUCH* what a PITA and headache that is compared to an IDE.

My attempts to learn to program that finally "stuck" began when I used Visual Studio 6.0.
keskiverto wrote:

If you did start 30-40 years ago, what editors did you use?

Editors 30-40 years ago? My editor was a keypunch machine and a tray of cards.
You were using punchcards in the mid-80s? Back then home users were programming their Commodores by typing into a barebonesy text editor, and WYSIWYG word processors were just about to hit the market (WordPerfect had been released a few years ago).
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Circa 1980 is when my local uni would have had one machine (available to students) in one building to read the punch cards, and students had to sign up for a time to process their cards. Luckily it was long gone by the time I programmed...
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