Which is the best?

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Which debugger, IDE and compiler is the best?
closed account (zwA4jE8b)
I am a huge fan of eclipse w/ CDT.
I use it on ubuntu and use gcc / g++
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closed account (zb0S216C)
For an IDE, I tend to use Code::Blocks, but the way it behaves sometimes gives me the reason to believe that the person who wrote it had his/her head on backwards. As for the compiler, I favour MinGW's compiler & debugger - MinGW has always been my favourite compiler suite.

Wazzak
the way it behaves sometimes gives me the reason to believe that the person who wrote it had his/her head on backwards


So I'm not the only one that thinks that! :)


I prefer Visual Studio for both an IDE and a debugger.
When it's an option I prefer Visual Studio with visual assist x add-on for all the above. Intellisense works great in general, VAX makes it great with C++
Whatever text editor you can find on the system you've ripped off and an old copy of gcc you cobbled together from source code found on the bus on the way to work. :)
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Framework wrote:
the way it behaves sometimes gives me the reason to believe that the person who wrote it had his/her head on backwards
Luc Lieber wrote:
So I'm not the only one that thinks that! :)


It's open source; fix it.
It's open source; fix it.

It's open source; fork it.
It's open source. Start a religious war about some ridiculously tiny inconsequential aspect of it.
It's open source; fix it.


I would much rather just refrain from using it until guaranteed customer support is offered and use a product that is backed by a trustworthy vendor...but each to his own.
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It's open source; fix it.


I never understood this mentality. To expect people to debug and fix software simply because it's open source is absurd.
I never understood this mentality.


I don't quite know the word that describes it...not laziness...more like cockiness. Sort of like a teenage mentality... :-\

PS: Didn't mean to offend any teens on this board - I'm sure you understand where I'm coming from with the stereotype though.
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I think the word you're looking for is "entitlement."

And, none taken.

To expect people to debug and fix software simply because it's open source is absurd.


At least you *can* look into it and try to fix it. Sometimes it is much faster than relying on commercial, almost non-existent in reality support, e.g. from Microsoft. I can't recall Microsoft ever fixing a bug in let's say MS Office or Windows on a request of customer. Unless you are a big corpo running 10000 workstations, the only advice you can expect from them is 3R (restart, repair, reinstall). And they charge money for their software, while most open-source projects do not.
To expect people to debug and fix software simply because it's open source is absurd.


Yet it happens every day.
It's not an expectation, it's an option. What makes open source software great is that if you don't like it, you can change it.
closed account (1yR4jE8b)
The flip-side of the coin is people that think they can demand features and the developers should drop everything and implement it for them, then get labeled as assholes when they say no. They don't realize that most open-source developers program on evenings and weekends in their spare-time for no pay, they don't realize that there is a person with a life that exists outside of that mailing list, bug tracker, and release channel.
Thank you chrisname, that is exactly the point. You don't like it, you fix it. You like it, good for you.
the only advice you can expect from them is 3R (restart, repair, reinstall).


From my experience, that's much more helpful than anything from most open-source maintainers. The only advice that you can expect from open source teams is something along the lines of... "well, fix it." or "google it". Setting up a build environment, acquiring all dependencies, configuring the build / runtime, learning the alien code-base, getting a stable build, and finally fixing the bug, testing the fix, and setting up a deployment is not realistically possible for those of us that have deadlines to consider...or those of us whose life doesn't revolve around programming.

On another note - to compare my personal experiences with closed-source software with open-source, I would wager that 90% closed source products work as expected or better than expected versus maybe 40% open source products, and I am being very generous with the 40%.

then get labeled as assholes when they say no


I only apply that label when they reply with a snarky comment like "fix it yourself".
I think you're also being generous with the 90%.
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