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Other programming languages used for game development?

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I'd like to be a game programmer and I know that I will need to know more languages than c++ if I want to get anywhere. So what other languages are used for game programming? I know there is java but that's about all I know
C++ is the most important one. You may want to learn Python and Lua, as they're commonly used for scripting. Everyone can benefit from knowing Haskell so I recommend that as well, even though it's rarely used for games (and never in the industry AFAIK).
closed account (o1vk4iN6)
LUA is a terrible language, I don't think I've seen any game use it where the developers are the ones having to write in it. You might want to look into Squirrel, I know it was used in Portal 2. Anyways scripting languages aren't that important (though that doesn't mean they aren't needed; some studios make their own script language, so it's a matter of managing your time on what's important) it also helps that Squirrel is C-like so it is easy to pick up (which scripting languages should be IMO). Python is good to know just in general.
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Gameplay programmers use LUA and Python quite often ASFAIK
closed account (o1vk4iN6)
Not in any games I know of, unless you mean indie ?

Unreal Engine, Bungie Inc, Ensemble Studio (rip) , ID Tech Engine all use their own language. I know some games where LUA is dominate where the community uses but not where the developers solely use it.
You may be right, actually. I have read somewhere that major companies (AAA title producers) use their own in-house scripting languages. Wikipedia has a nice list of where it is used, though.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lua_(programming_language)#Video_games
Sorry, but what are scripting languages?
Non-compiled, interpreted languages. Typically they're easier to pick and use, but have more overheard.
C++ is the most common game programming language. You may want to look into a graphics plug in, such as OpenGL to get graphics. Other languages are here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_programming_languages
If you want to get into professional game development, I would suggest that you learn DirectX first, not OpenGL. Although ts perfectly fine to know both, you really only see DirectX being used by big game developers, not so much OpenGL.
I totally agree with "ModShop". Right, C++ is the most powerful programming language. But certainly it's more complex than other languages. The goal of the professional game development is, choose a programming interface that's best, such as DirectX. Certainly all languages start with nothing, only basic functions, and most likely it's a hard problem to make a sublime game. So you no need to think too much about game programming language. Download a SDK, game library and then play... :)
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Right, C++ is the most powerful programming language.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turing_completeness
closed account (o1vk4iN6)
Yes, I'd recommend using sed to program a game.

@ ModShop

Have you heard of Valve ? They have been doing some ground breaking stuff with OpenGL and linux usually where Microsoft and Windows andand Directx tend to fail, speed.
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Only see DirectX used by big game devs? If by big game devs you mean those that program exclusively for the xbox and windows, then maybe.
Non-compiled, interpreted languages. Typically they're easier to pick and use, but have more overheard.

Scripting languages can be compiled too, in fact most of the blogs I've read say they use compiled scripting languages and I've played with Lua both non-compiled and compiled.

If you want to get into professional game development, I would suggest that you learn DirectX first, not OpenGL. Although ts perfectly fine to know both, you really only see DirectX being used by big game developers, not so much OpenGL.

PS3 uses a Linux based OS to run on and most games use OpenGL while the PC/360 versions use DX. If you want to make it in the game industry you need to know C++, assembly (yes this is still used in console development as MIPS is still used for PS2 and PS3, don't know what 360s asm instruction set is), and need to know DX, OpenGL, Python, and Lua. You can't hurt learning Allegro/SDL/SFML and other free tools or demo tools like Unreal Development Kit (UDK) or Torque Game Engine or even play with Game Maker.
closed account (o1vk4iN6)
I doubt they use assembly very often, unless they are disclosed information about the hardware (is this openly available ? I don't really follow console hardware as they are rather old and not open as such making it harder to develop for without the bling), they could very well be creating slower code than what the compiler could do.
xerzi wrote:
I doubt they use assembly very often, unless they are disclosed information about the hardware (is this openly available ? I don't really follow console hardware as they are rather old and not open as such making it harder to develop for without the bling), they could very well be creating slower code than what the compiler could do.

Well I know that Ed Boon of Mortal Kombat said he still uses Assembly (even admitted to using it for MK 9) to squeeze every ounce of speed out that he could. Same with the Burnout Paradise programmers. I've seen a lot of programmers say they still use Assembly especially on consoles to pull as much speed as they can. Wish I could remember who it was and for what company, but I remember one saying that people think it is old and unneeded, but assembly is still relevant even in today's games.
closed account (1yR4jE8b)
PS3 uses a Linux based OS to run on


I doubt this is true, PS3 OS isn't open source.
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In the making of uncharted 2 one of naughty dog's employees said they used some asm in their engine, I think for rendering
darkestfight wrote:
I doubt this is true, PS3 OS isn't open source.

PS2 was Linux and wasn't open source. They released a dev kit that was only available on Linux (was $250 I think) in order to make PS2 games and the PS3 is the same way as they have hinted at a Linux dev kit for the PS3 for indie developers, but have kept pushing it back and holding off on releasing one. Also the reason they removed the OS feature as it caused huge security issues with the system.
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