What IDE should I use?

I am currently using Dev as my IDE, and I realize that it is supposed to be terrible for numerous reasons. Due to this fact I would like to start using a different program. Which one should I use and why?
I suppose VS isn't bad, although MS's policy is somewhat irritating (example http://connect.microsoft.com/VisualStudio/feedback/details/576750/c-0x-std-to-string-is-non-conforming )

Then there's eclipse, Code::Blocks, Netbeans, Qt-Builder, you name it.
Code::Blocks is my personal favourite.

Find it very easy to use.

Find VS very awkward to use. Took me a long time to even fine the compile button/command lol.
For C++ Visual Studio is great but it can be irritating as hell sometimes. I do all my C++ is gedit tbh because I create my own test cases and but I won't lie, Kdevelop is pretty nice for the Linux/Unix environment.

But when it comes to developing web apps or writing in C#, Visial Studio is unmatched. It would take a month of dedicated learning to understand everything that it offers in those areas.
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I use eclipse and it is excellent. However it can be a little tricky to configure sometimes.

Find VS very awkward to use. Took me a long time to even fine the compile button/command lol.
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It took you a long time to find a bright green arrow that looks the same and is in almost the same position as in almost any other IDE?
There's a green arrow for compile?

I just use F7.
Worded that rather wrong I see.

When I first started C++ I started with VS, at the time I remember opening it and seeing this _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[]) and stdafx.h and thinking wtf I have never seen that before (coded in other languages before, seen a lot of C++ code in places). So I think ok let's just run it and see what happens, oh look there's the green arrow, no wait that's start debugging, I just want to run it and see what happens. So then you see build solution, build project_name, etc and then there's compile sitting down there under the build menu.

Click it, ========== Build: 1 succeeded, 0 failed, 0 up-to-date, 0 skipped ==========. Then nothing. Where's the output i wondered, do I have to build it? What's a solution? And so I decided to leave VS and C++ since it just seemed like too much hassle to run a program and go back to MATLAB. A few months later I go back and dl code blocks instead, within 10 seconds of it starting it I had the good old black console window with hello world, so I stuck with that.

I have literally no patience with a software program if I can't immediately see how it all works, this is likely why I never use Microsoft programs like office since they're just bloated messes that take 10x longer to start up than any other just as good program. I could run an orbital simulation in the time it takes VS to start up on my laptop... It is the least user friendly program I have ever used, even going back to it know when it's just unbearable to work with.

mini not-really-a-rant rant over.
I use Dev C++ , simple, sweet and to the point..

And horribly outdated, buggy, offering less features than a good text editor.
The many failings of Dev Cpp V4.9.9.2 (also known as 5 Beta) and earlier are listed here:

http://www.cplusplus.com/forum/articles/36896/


Green arrows? Surely the symbols "a", "e", "k" and "m" on the keyboard? :)

Click it, ========== Build: 1 succeeded, 0 failed, 0 up-to-date, 0 skipped ==========. Then nothing. Where's the output i wondered, do I have to build it? What's a solution?


F7 builds, F5 runs, F10 single steps over, F11 single steps through. After that, it's just setting up watch variables. It's not that hard, but whatever you're comfortable with.
I was posting in terms of me many months ago when I first started. I know how to use VS now. Programming is just a tool to aid my maths stuff so code blocks suits me fine since it's very user friendly and gets the job done.
If you want a customizable IDE that you can plug in multiple compilers into at the expense of having to have a higher understanding of your toolchain, then code::blocks would be a good IDE.

If you want an IDE that is guaranteed to compile your code out of the box with no setting up paths, compilers, flags, switches, toggles, buttons, and buzzers, then Microsoft's Visual Studio would be a good IDE.

Personally, I prefer Microsoft's product.
If you want a customizable IDE that you can plug in multiple compilers into at the expense with the benefit of having to have a higher understanding of your toolchain
:)
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