Book Of Brilliant Things: discussion

There have been a few questions about books recently so I thought I would put a list together. The beginning of which can be seen here while it waits approval:
http://www.cplusplus.com/articles/preview/27/

I don't want to list loads of books in each section, just a few highly regarded ones. I have a few ideas for different subject but comments and suggestions welcome.
This is a great idea! There's only one thing I don't like about programming books: they're really expensive. I can never afford any :(
I highly recommend adding:

Generic Programming and the STL: Using and Extending the C++ Standard Template Library
by Matthew H. Austern

Design Patterns
by Erich Gamma, Richard Helm, Ralph Johnson, John Vlissides (GoF)
There's only one thing I don't like about programming books: they're really expensive.

I know what you mean, it took may years of watching the price, on amazon, of The Art of Computer Programming before it got to a price that I could live with paying.

Design Patterns, is going to make it on the list...when I can decide on the subjects.

Can anyone else comment on Generic Programming and the STL, I have not come across this book but will look into it, I have other books from the Addison-Wesley Professional Computing Series that I think are good.
For example, I wanted Operating Systems Design and Implementation by Tanenbaum; but the only one I found was about £95(!).

As for The Art of Computer Programming, having read the wikipedia article on Donald Knuth (I had heard of him before, but didn't think to find out about him) I can only surmise that I should get that book...

In about three months I'll be 16, then I can get a job... maybe I'll be able to buy those books then.

Edit: I think O'Reilly books in general are very useful for programmers.
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chrisname, You can get the 3rd edition of Operating Systems Design and Implementation in paperback for about £45 from Amazon. Operating System Concepts by Abraham Silberschatz (AKA the dinosaur book) is also worth a look.

I like O'Reilly books, I find them concise and easy to read. On the other hand I hate SAMS. A long time ago on separate occasions I bought SAMS books and did not get on with them, big books that did not cover the subject in anything near the detail their size suggests (read: shallow wordy crap)[your milage may vary]. That is one of the reasons I am very much more choosy about the books I buy now.

Tip 1: If you have a University nearby; find their bookshop and Library, most Universities don't mind non-students using them. You can often find bargains in the book shop, they sometimes over stock or some sell second hand books. As for the library, you can often go in and study there but not borrow the books. You can then have a good read of books that you are interested in to make sure they are worth it.

Tip 2: Find a charity shops near the university campus, students often 'off load' books they no-longer need. I have picked up some absolute bargains from my local Oxfam and you help a charity.
You can get the 3rd edition of Operating Systems Design and Implementation in paperback for about £45 from Amazon. Operating System Concepts by Abraham Silberschatz (AKA the dinosaur book) is also worth a look.

Oh, thanks :)

I like O'Reilly books, I find them concise and easy to read.

Me too; and I also find that they have a conversational tone (i.e. they're not overly formal) and occasional jokes.

@Tip 1,
I didn't know you could do that; but I don't know where my nearest University is.

@Tip 2,
Good idea.
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