Best Profession NOT programming

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Hi,

I am being serious here,what profession is a good, I am thinking Virologists is good profession, DAM but it has a lot of scope ( From my perspective at least), what jobs are well paid but also good scope, I know this is not right but my idea is Programming is getting outsourced to India, China and other rising 3rd world countries.
My plan, is get a good job and programing in spare time and try attempt to get a job in Software so I have two choices to do, as now a days programming\software engineers do not require Degree.

So whats your thought?
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Being dead serious, a food chain.
A 'good profession' depends on why you got into it, what your interests are. For example, if you love kids and love teaching, the teaching is a good profession, but pays poor. If you are just looking for tons of money, then Presidency of the US is a good profession. Otherwise, a job is a job.
If you are just looking for tons of money, then Presidency of the US is a good profession.
Not worth it. You should be a stock broker for lots of money.
closed account (3qX21hU5)
as now a days programming\software engineers do not require Degree.

I would revisit that view if I were you. If anything programming/software engineering jobs are increasingly requiring you to have a degree. But I have had this debate plenty of times on this forum so will drop that subject.


As for your question I would agree with BHX it really depends on what you like to do. What you want your career to be should be decided by you and what you like to do. If you choose your career (Don't mistake career with job they are two way different things) just because it has the most jobs availible or it pays the most1 but you don't really enjoy doing it you will be miserable.

Choose a career path that you enjoy and I garentuee you will have a much greater chance of suceeding in it (Because you actually like doing your work) and you will be much happier.


1 - Wanted to clarify that you shouldn't ignore pay or availability completely. Both should come into play when making a career decision but my advice would be don't make them the number 1 priority. I personally wouldn't choose a career that pays really good over a career that I would love to do.
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Every person is different... but as far as finding a good profession goes... I'd say it's any job which has all of the below:

1) Is tolerable (ie: you don't dread going into work every day)

2) Pays enough to get by - and you not having to be stressed out over not being able to pay the bills. Extra money is nice, but not really that important once you make enough to sustain your lifestyle.

3) Does not interfere with what you really want to do with your life. (You don't live for your work... your work to support your life)


People in the States tend to put waaaaaaay too much emphasis on how much a job pays, when really that is one of the least important aspects of it.

The bottom line is... do you have a job that makes you miserable? If yes, then you have the wrong job.
@Disch
Those criteria are often mutually exclusive, though; particularly for the poor and the poorly educated, two groups with significant overlap. Plus, although I agree with the idea of doing a job that you can tolerate, or even enjoy, and not accumulating superfluous material wealth, for some--perhaps even most--people, the only jobs available are mind-numbingly boring ones that leave the employee struggling to make ends meet. Also, only earning enough money to "get by" is short-sighted--it leaves you high-and-dry in an emergency (especially if your country doesn't have free healthcare or if you have expensive uninsured belongings).
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closed account (o1vk4iN6)
if you have expensive uninsured belongings


You probably shouldn't be selling your organs just so you can have an ifone. I see so many people buy the new iphone even when they have a perfectly functional version of the iphone just an older model. I got the ipod touch when it first came out, was expensive as shit but I still have it and use it daily.
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This is getting funny.

chrisname Regardless of whether you're poor and/or poorly educated, you can still get a job which fulfills your personal career objectives. Spend your days on Cplusplus.com and you'll get the education you need to be a programmer (like I did). If some organization doesn't hire you because you don't have a degree, then all you need is an idea. Develop the idea yourself and make millions. All you need is a computer and then your job is tolerable (because you probably like programming), it pays enough (because your company is yours and your program is desired) and you're doing what you want with your life (because you probably like programming).
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What about gifts, or possessions you've had since before you were unable to afford insurance? For example, I have two guitars worth £200 each and I can't afford to insure them. Luckily my parents pay the insurance for me.
closed account (o1vk4iN6)
Sell the guitars and buy one for 50 instead :P. Is it even worth insuring something worth 200 pounds, i'm sure at some point you'll end up paying more than 200 pounds for them in insurance alone.
the best job is whatever you find out that you enjoy. If you follow money, you will end up in a nightmare.
Lumpkin wrote:
Not worth it. You should be a stock broker for lots of money.

You are aware that if a President makes it to the end of his term he gets a guaranteed set amount of money for life and Secret Service guards for life? Way better than a stock broker. Think Congress gets a similar deal money wise after they retire.

Unless they changed that after I stopped paying attention to politics.
@xerzi
"Is it even worth insuring something worth £x, I'm sure at some point you'll end up paying more than £x for them in insurance alone."
This is what insurance companies depend on to make money. They rely on most of their customers paying more than the value of the insured goods over time. The point is, if they do get stolen, I don't need to have £400 on hand to replace them.
closed account (3qX21hU5)
This is what insurance companies depend on to make money. They rely on most of their customers paying more than the value of the insured goods over time. The point is, if they do get stolen, I don't need to have £400 on hand to replace them.


Actually that isn't true. Complete premium to loss ratios for insurance companies usually break about even (Sometimes in the insurance companies favor sometimes not). The way insurance companies turn a profit is by investing with the premiums that they collect.

Just wanted to point out a common misconception people have with insurance companies. That they don't really make money usually on the premiums people pay (In other words they aren't charging you more then what is it worth or hoping to outlast the value of the item), instead they make the money by doing investments with the pool of premiums.

Also xerzi's is right you won't find any insurance company that is willing to insure something for $400 by itself and it wouldn't be worth it because you deductible would be more then that most likely. I believe you live outside of the US so I am not really familiar with your insurance laws and policies but in the US if you live with your parents their house insurance policy will cover the guitars under the personal property portion in the case of a loss that is covered by their policy.

If you live by yourself in a apartment or dorm I would consider getting renters insurance to cover your personal property (Again in the US I am not familiar with other countries insurance laws or policies).
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You are aware that if a President makes it to the end of his term he gets a guaranteed set amount of money for life and Secret Service guards for life
Money for life, yes.

Guards, no.

It's like the most stressful job in the world. Not to mention the amount of money you need for initial advertising.
closed account (3qX21hU5)
Actually the guards stay with them for life.
I meant I didn't know the guards stayed with them for life. I wasn't going against what he said.
closed account (3qX21hU5)
Ahh sorry misunderstood that my bad.
@zereo
I don't live with my parents so it's not covered by their policy. What I have is full contents insurance. Both of my guitars, plus my ~£700 computer are covered, and I assume some other things. My excess is lower because I have a student policy, I'm fairly sure it's lower than the cost of either guitar individually, let alone both combined. Also, remember that I'm using GBP, not USD. £400 is about $640.
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