question for all ios developers

closed account (Dy7SLyTq)
so this isn't meant to start an android v ios v windows phone war and i dont want it to be either (at least until my question is answered at least). so i attempted to develop for ios about a year ago, and then realized i wasnt good at it. so in the spirit of open mindedness could someone explain the following:
why would one want to develop for ios when it requires the following (and if im wrong on any of these please let me know):
-a $100 yearly membership for access to the app store/xcode/the virtual iphone/obj-c compiler/dev suite when the android sdk is free and windows has a free release
-your sandboxed
-it takes i think two weeks per release
-your more than likely to lose money on it

also what is great about obj-c? it seems like the love child of java and c. it was very confusing. so what did you like about it and what advantages does it provide?
Because if you make decent ios stuff you can make serious amounts of money.

-Mats (who has several friends and acquaintances who develop apps)
How is sandboxing a downside?
The development suite (XCode) is actually free. This means that the Objective-C compiler, virtual iPhone, and all the development tools are free.
https://developer.apple.com/xcode/

As for Objective-C, I quietly suspect that Apple NeXT just wanted to pick a compiled language that wasn't as complex/difficult as C++, was closer to C-family languages than Smalltalk, and didn't want to go for Java for one reason or another (Sun Microsystems?).

EDIT @Grey Wolf from http://www.cplusplus.com/forum/lounge/115571/#msg631128
Oooh, you're right. Thanks for letting me know!


-Albatross
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closed account (Dy7SLyTq)
Because if you make decent ios stuff you can make serious amounts of money.

not neccesarily. i have seen several good apps that arent popular but are well coded.

How is sandboxing a downside?

it probably depends on your point of view. i dont like it because i want things like app locks and es file explorer

The development suite (XCode) is actually free. This means that the Objective-C compiler, virtual iPhone, and all the development tools are free.

my mistake. what does the $100 membership get you then?
closed account (jwkNwA7f)
-a $100 yearly membership for access to the app store/xcode/the virtual iphone/obj-c compiler/dev suite when the android sdk is free and windows has a free release

the $100 is only for putting your app on the app store and testing it on a real iOS device.
also what is great about obj-c?

Nothing. But when it is all you have, you kinda have to.

I don't actually develop for iOS, but I started once and now develop for macs.
As for Objective-C, I quietly suspect that Apple just wanted to pick a compiled language that...
It would be NeXT that chose it for NeXTSTEP, the OS that Mac OS X and iOS are descended from.
not neccesarily. i have seen several good apps that arent popular but are well coded.

Well coded does not imply it should popular. I can program a pristine pile of crap, but nobody is going to buy my $.99 turd.
I can't stand iOS development. At every corner Apple takes away another freedom. You're not allowed to use software that I developed how you wish, even if you pay Apple you can't distribute your own software in the manner you see fit.
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