Is hacking in to CIA legal?

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closed account (z05DSL3A)
rtd2645 wrote:
I noticed that no one is actually posting a citation to a law or statute; yes I am suggesting that every answer given so far is based on a personal belief about what is right and wrong.

http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1990/18/section/1 is enough for anyone in the UK but as the OP does not say where in the world he is it would be pointless speculating as to what law he may or may not be breaking.
Yeah, I have to agree, he is just trolling on here. Console wars, PC wars, legality of hacking CIA, wanting to know who uses torrents, etc.
'm sure armed guards would shoot you before you get near the vicinity to hack their headquarters.


You'd be surprised how easy it can be to get past physical security. There's a ton of pretty interesting cases of it out there.
Oh... Well I'm sure they have like a keycard that protects outsiders from getting in there...

You have to be a pretty good hacker to get through that, you'll need an axe of a pretty strong material.
Or just a convincing reason to be wherever you are.

Or just drop infected flash drives in the parking lot :)
I know I can never resist the opportunity for a new flash drive
Ironic considering I found a thumbdrive on the ground not to long ago and plugged it I my PC...
I wonder how many flash drives are outside GCHQ and NSA HQ etc? I see autumn leaves of flash drives on the car park...

I also found out hacking CIA is legal, if you live in China... Or at least, the Chinese authorities don't seem too bothered about what kind of infiltration its citizens are doing to foreign governments or business.
closed account (Dy7SLyTq)
Yes it is, and it's really easy too. Their IP address is 127.0.0.1.

i know its an old quote, but this is serious... just today i was uploading and connecting to 127.0.0.1 (although using localhost seemed to do the trick...). does this mean the cia use my laptop?
127.0.0.1 is a joke because it can be any computer because the local host is by default set to that aka a loop back address.
closed account (Dy7SLyTq)
i know lol i was kidding. its a basic fundamental of web design with lamp
giblit wrote:
127.0.0.1 is a joke because it can be any computer

The joke is that, on any sane system, "hacking" 127.0.0.1 would be destroying your own system.
Yeah, I'm always lazy in that regard as I put localhost rather than 127.0.0.1 for messing with web dev ideas.
Hmm... I think this calls for logical deduction:

1. CIA stores crap on servers
Servers:
- Not a good idea to store information on, can be hacked by a skilled-enough hacker
- any expert knows how vulnerable servers are

Therefore the CIA must know that servers are vulnerable to attack.

2. It would be better to store the information on machines physically wired. Classified documents could be stored in those, and anyone needing them would have to be in the same building.

Conclusion:

The CIA knows this, therefore, they have willingly put information on a publicly available global network of computers.

Can we argue that it is illegal to access publicly available information? Is it not freedom of the press to collect and spread publicly available information?

It's kind of like putting sensitive information in the garbage bin, then trying to make that garbage bin inaccessable to everyone even on the way to the dumpster... Should we be liable for information put out by the CIA that's just surrounded by lockouts?

Technically speaking, it's just as free as this website, only they have put lockouts.
closed account (Dy7SLyTq)
- Not a good idea to store information on, can be hacked by a skilled-enough hacker
servers are great for storing info on.

Servers:
- Not a good idea to store information on, can be hacked by a skilled-enough hacker
- any expert knows how vulnerable servers are
uhhh i dont think you know what your talking about there. the security has nothing to do with the server. more the hardware used and the software.

have you ever heard of a server room?

edit:
Is it not freedom of the press to collect and spread publicly available information?
no... those are two different things. freedon of press is the ability to say anything as long as it doesnt affect matters of national security
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@DTS:

Servers are connected to the internet, are they not?
closed account (3qX21hU5)
Servers are connected to the internet, are they not?


No.. Not always. I can guarantee the CIA would not have their internal servers that hold classified data connected to the internet.

A lot file servers for businesses will only have network level access to them. Anyone that would connect a file server that holds sensitive information directly to the internet is quite stupid in my opinion unless they have a very good reason (And I can't think of any).

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Zereo wrote:
No.. Not always. I can guarantee the CIA would not have their internal servers that hold classified data connected to the internet.

Almost everything is at least indirectly connected to the Internet.
closed account (3qX21hU5)
Almost everything is at least indirectly connected to the Internet.


Yea that is true but in order to get access to that server (Meaning the hypothetical CIA servers) you would have to pivot a huge amount of times most likely (By which time you would have been discovered most likely) until you get lucky enough to compromise a computer that has access to the said servers.

I was just trying to point out that what IWishIKnew is trying to imply (That all servers are connected directly to the internet and they are a huge security risk, and the other things) just aren't true.
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Oh yeah for sure. Until IPv6 becomes the norm....

I actually don't know much about IPv6, I just think I heard somewhere that private addressing is gone...
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