Good C++ practices

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OK, so at a point a person will not find anything new or interesting to learn in C++ but its quite helpful and worth the effort to adopt good C++ coding practices. There are many who don't know these, including myself. Therefore, I ask that if you know any, please list them. :)
I would start with Sutter/Alexandrescu's book "C++ Coding Standards" , although it doesn't go into too much detail.

And stay away from Google style guide if you want to be taken seriously.
There is a list of good ones at http://isocpp.org/wiki/faq/coding-standards . In fact, the whole FAQ could be shown as a 'Good Practices' guide, and goes in-depth with common questions and problems with C++ - I'd highly recommend that people take a look.
Cubbi wrote:
And stay away from Google style guide if you want to be taken seriously.

What's interesting is that a few of their guidelines are in line with those given by the FQA.
"Don't use exceptions."
"Avoid initialization in constructors / use initialization member functions."

There are also some weird ones.
"Don't use lambdas."
"Don't use streams."
What's interesting is that a few of their guidelines are in line with those given by the FQA.

Yes, they're both trash. EC++ was even worse "don't use namespaces because we don't know what they are for", but I think nobody remembers it anymore.
Yeah sure. Google is such a pathetic company, all their projects fail spectacularly, they never made anything decent, nobody uses any of their shitty products. Its obvious they know nothing about programming.
Google is a great company, but their C++ style guide is an unfortunate disaster. Plenty of people who work there are very vocal about it, too.
Anyway, this thread was supposed to be about good practices.
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Almost everyone uses Google's products. Android is their product. Almost every non-i or windows phone uses Android OS. A lot of people use Google chrome. They created the first semi-self driving car. They are a great company :).
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Effective C++ by Scott Meyers
@ NT3: Interesting FAQ...the author has a sense of humour too. I like it xD.

@ Nathan2222: Being famous and an oligopolist in the software industry doesn't always necessarily mean that they are the best at programming ;).
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+1 Effective C++

Also, Code Complete by Steve McConnell. It isn't C++ specific, but I read it for the first time when I was doing an internship in college, and it drastically and immediately improved my software development ability.
@Nathan2222: If it's not obvious, I was being sarcastic.
closed account (iAk3T05o)
They aren't the best but they really good. Competition being apple, Microsoft and (is there any other?).
Sorry Abramus.
@stormboy: you are the first person i've seen that has admitted to learning C++ to the point that nothing is new or interesting. All i usually see is "i've been programming for a million years in c++ but i still consider myself at intermediate level".
You mean Google hasn't renamed it from Android since buying it in 2005? Figured by now they would have done something dumb like G-roid or something.
you are the first person i've seen that has admitted to learning C++ to the point that nothing is new or interesting
that depends on what you find interesting. i might find coding standards interesting but stormboy might not.

. All i usually see is "i've been programming for a million years in c++ but i still consider myself at intermediate level".
it would be arrogant to say otherwise. ive seen some of the most brilliant coders on here (for example disch) learn something new. i doubt that there are very many actual experts (i could be wrong however)
Being an expert does not mean you know 100% of something.
i never said it did
I could list a few good practices, but they're all in Effective C++, as the others have mentioned. Superb book.

You can get a second hand edition on Amazon for less that $1. Probably an older edition but still very valid.
@Little Bobby Tables
The only person that I think can say they are a master of C++ and get away with it would probably be Bjarne Stroustrup, but even then I'd doubt he would ever say he is. I've always said, I'm a student of many languages and master of none.
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