Where Can C++ Take an 11 Year Old?

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#Fredbill Send the program that you are most proud of, Comparing yourself to someone that none of us know does not prove much.
I don't have a program on the PC I'm currently using, but at home I am working on a Resource Manager, also, that's basically all I can send because my dad formatted my other pc with my good programs.
and you didnt write a backup program?
The reason it was formatted was because there was a virus, I tried to transfer it to my more powerful PC, but I got blue screened. Every time I tried, I got blue screened.
You could have just popped the hard drive in your new computer, that way you would not have to boot from it but still be able to retrieve data.

EDIT:

That is, if there is a secondary hard drive bay. If not, external hard drive shell ftw.
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strongdrink wrote:
#Fredbill Send the program that you are most proud of, Comparing yourself to someone that none of us know does not prove much.

Yeah, for all we know his dad could be the worse programmer alive so it does little to show his abilities in comparison.
He said he was an intermediate programmer, why do you guys keep probing him? If he can keep up with his dad in C (especially if his dad is at the top of his class) he's probably competent. At the very least, he's better than all of the other 11 year old's who are l33t Game Maker hackers.
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I feel like I'm the one that started the griefing on this thread. I never meant to discourage the OP but I want their expectations of the future to be realistic. No company is going to hire an adolescent to do real dev work regardless of their experience. Even if the OP is some prodigy hacker the other people on the team would be offended that a kid is showing them up. He should take this time to build a resume that makes puts him at the top of the list at every company he applies to.
ascii wrote:
He said he was an intermediate programmer, why do you guys keep probing him? If he can keep up with his dad in C (especially if his dad is at the top of his class) he's probably competent. At the very least, he's better than all of the other 11 year old's who are l33t Game Maker hackers.

Well the problem I have is that too many colleges now have half-assed degrees and courses. So his dad being one of the top in a class means even less than him being better than his dad. As a programmer I never take anything at face value. I started programming at the age of 15 and I'm 30 (almost 31) and don't even consider myself intermediate, but that is just me and shouldn't be using that as a comparison so forget that one. He may be a prodigy, but as Computergeek01 pointed out, no company will hire him and I hate to say it, but most companies covet a degree on top of the experience. This is one reason I stopped messing with looking for a programming job and instead stay at home to take care of my family.
@BHXSpecter
You've been programming for 15 years and don't consider yourself intermediate? Out of curiosity what do you think makes an intermediate level programmer?
naraku9333 wrote:
You've been programming for 15 years and don't consider yourself intermediate? Out of curiosity what do you think makes an intermediate level programmer?

The number of years are irrelevant. I know a guy that has been programming games for 20+ years and still considers himself a beginner for the same reason I do. You can never stop learning. Even if I could build my own Operating System with applications I built and games from scratch all myself, I would still consider myself a beginner as I could still learn more.
You're not a beginner because you can learn more. With that definition, everyone is still a beginner at everything. You're defining this waay too black and white.
I'm telling you that I'm reasonably good. I can keep up with Advanced Code on this website. Is that enough to convince you?
closed account (z05DSL3A)
http://www.cplusplus.com/forum/lounge/29979/
I just wanted to say that the second result on Google for "itt tech" is titled "ITT - Tech Is A SCAM!!!!!!!!!!".
While I'm not using this to make any statements about your dad's skills or your own, Fredbill30, you're not really telling us anything.
After a few months of programming, I also thought I was pretty good. As it turns out, people are terrible judges of their own abilities.

If you've only been programming for three months, that would put you at the beginner level. If you're at the regular schooling level for your age, you also have the disadvantage of knowing very little math, which handicaps your problem-solving skills compared to someone older.
This isn't meant to discourage you at all. I'm just putting things in perspective. Keep practicing and playing around with code. I'm sure you'll make a good programmer one day if you do.
Actually, since learning C++, I have increased my Math skills, (I was pretty sure 7th grade honors wouldn't cut it) so I have took some classes online, I read my Dad's textbooks for college and right now I'm learning Trigonometry.


Also, after reading Return 0's post, I still think I am still intermediate, I can write pretty bug-free code, and I know when to use certain tools.
Ahh forget about 'how good' you are. Just build up a portfolio and try applying for a job when you are legal age. Good luck :)

EDIT:

And as others have said -- probably the best way to get experience until that time is to work on an open source project.

EDIT 2:

@ascii
He said he was an intermediate programmer, why do you guys keep probing him?

He asked how far he could go at his age. The only way to know is to know how experienced he is... to probe him. :)
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I actually graduated from ITT and I understand the sentiment that it is a scam. It's not that you don't learn anything useful, or that the degree is useless because that's not true. It's the fact that they charge you about $500 USD per credit hour for what is, course wise, a community college level education.

There are reasons to go there though. The instructors aren't "professional teachers" they are much better then what you would find at most schools and they are often actively working in the field that they are teaching so you get that exposure to their experience. Also the way the courses are laid out is IMO infinitely better organised then you will find at any public school. There is no worry that you can't take a class this semester because it filled up too quick or that two of your classes schedules or exams might conflict, you don't have to run all over the state to find some obscure text book that you'll never open for one class. You never have to worry about 12 hour school days and having to go to work afterward. You sign up for a degree and they make sure enough seats are available for everybody to take the classes when they need them. At the beginning of a semester they give you everything you need shrink wrapped together nice and neat. They space out the classes through out the week for that semester so that you're never going to more then one class a day. They have a tighter reign on what is taught in the classes so you don't have to worry about a teacher from last semester not preparing you for the next class. I'm not saying it's worth ALL of the money that they charge you but the good things like these made it a very attractive option to someone like me.

EDIT: I also wanted to mention about the instructors, you'll have the same ones for different classes so they try a little harder to build a friendly personal relationship. You also don't get any of those nut jobs that think you life should revolve around ancient south African poetry or something else retarded like that. In fact the instructors that teach the technical classes do some of the mandatory ones as well. For example my DSP teacher was also my economics teacher.
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Fredbill30 wrote:
I'm telling you that I'm reasonably good. I can keep up with Advanced Code on this website. Is that enough to convince you?

That means nothing too. I know a few programmers that can follow advanced code, but can't code it to save their lives.

Fredbill30 wrote:
Actually, since learning C++, I have increased my Math skills, (I was pretty sure 7th grade honors wouldn't cut it) so I have took some classes online, I read my Dad's textbooks for college and right now I'm learning Trigonometry.

I admit, because of how much I was tormented when I started, I like to tease a little. This isn't one of those times, you don't learn the math skills as you program, you need to learn them before you start programming. It is great you are learning trig, but you will have to learn a lot harder things than trig (though, you will learn some of them as you go, so keep plugging away despite our nay-saying).

Fredbill30 wrote:
Also, after reading Return 0's post, I still think I am still intermediate, I can write pretty bug-free code, and I know when to use certain tools.

Bug-free code is a myth. If you are an intermediate programmer like you say, then you will have a lot of bugs (I mean even 'expert' programmers still admit that they have tons of bugs in their code). The fact you say your code is bug-free is yet another sign that you are still a beginner. What tools are you referring to though? Git, valgrind, compiler, debugger, linker, ide?
One thing I've learned is that you can tell when you're getting better because you begin to produce some seriously f****d up bugs. Like, really messed up stuff that makes you question the correctness of the compiler, the debugger, or your own sanity.
Then after a while you know you're getting even better because you start to adopt techniques that minimize the occurrence of bugs or that make them more immediately visible.

Of course, this does mean that if something gets through your safety net, it will be nothing short of an Eldritch abomination.
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