Java, or C++?

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LOLOLOL
What's that website all about?
closed account (3qX21hU5)
What's that website all about?


Hmm maybe you could go there and find out?
ok but in that case id actually have to do work.

Lol jk. I'll check it out.
Fredbill's situation right now http://xkcd.com/1053/
Welcome to the joy of xkcd.
ok.
no, here is rapidcoder:

http://xkcd.com/386/

ROFLMAO

And here's another one:

http://xkcd.com/323/

Rapidcoder must be experiencing Ballmer's Peak... He seems to know everything!
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In response to the second cartoon, I think windows tries a new Blood Alcohol Level with every second version, only to realise they have f***ed up their OS and revert to the previous Level.
I think they discovered a better level with Windows 7....

- SIGH - ... I miss Windows 7... (i got windows 8... acer touch screen (fragile as F*** laptop that weighs at least 5 pound or more)
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Wow these cartoons are sure, amazing tell me a cartoon version of me please.
THIS IS WHY WE HAVE [computer Language] VS [Computer Language] threads like this:

http://xkcd.com/927/

Just another "universal Standard"...
there will be one language eventually, it will be called revenge++
@IWishIKnew idk if this has been covered. I'm not going to read 6 pages of posts to find out.

In the real world you will find that different geographical locations have natural preferences towards different languages. A lot of the times this will be reflected in the nature of the local university courses. A local university teaching Java will increase the chances of local businesses using Java (because that is what people entering the local work force will be skilled in).

You will find this pattern increase to almost all languages. Local university cranking our Python educated web-developers will foster a bigger Python community than for example Ruby.

In general there are some domains where you will almost exclusively find C++ or Java but these days those lists are getting smaller and smaller as the JVM speeds increase.

High-Frequency Trading has been one of the mainstays of C++, but in recent years you find a lot of the systems are being converted to Java or C# because of the safety features provided by the VMs. Nothing is worse than the application having a segfault during a huge operation and then you have to manually debug it vs having the VM print out the conditions of the fault. (By huge operation I mean one that takes days/weeks to complete.. e.g hindcasting, forecasting).

The reason you find systems moving away from C++ is for ease-of-development despite a sacrifice in speed. While speed is still important now, if you're looking at something like 100% extra costs in development to do it in C++ vs Python you'd save A LOT of money by dumping a fraction of that money in to better hardware and probably achieve near the same speeds at the end of the day.

In all honesty, I would look at where you want to live and what kind of development job you would like and then train in those skills. Language itself is only really about 10% of the skillset required to be a good developer. Spend considerable amount of time studying other concepts like unit testing, integration testing, networking, database, development methodologies, build systems, operating systems, design patterns.

Edit: Some context. I've worked professionally in C#, VB.Net, ASP, PHP, C++, Delphi, Python, Javascript (and others) in multiple different industries. I've also done development in Java.
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Interesting.

@Zaita

Thank you for the input. I will keep that in mind when job searching.

Frankly, I do real well in C++. Aka: I can pretty much write it off the top of my head right now, and I'm not overly fond of the thought of learning 10 other languages just to be hired. That is why I asked the question in the first place. Although it may be better for me to learn multiple languages, I still feel that, for the sake of knowledge, I would do much better off taking it slow to start off.

I will look into the areas which hire C++ programmers. Thank you Zaita.
closed account (o1vk4iN6)
While speed is still important now, if you're looking at something like 100% extra costs in development to do it in C++ vs Python you'd save A LOT of money by dumping a fraction of that money in to better hardware and probably achieve near the same speeds at the end of the day


Idk if python was just a random example, but that is probably the opposite when python 3 came out and all your code was written in python 2.
closed account (3qX21hU5)
Idk if python was just a random example, but that is probably the opposite when python 3 came out and all your code was written in python 2.


You act like Python 2 isn't supported anymore or won't be in the next few years. Python 2 will be supported for at least 10 years from now so people can adjust when they want to.
Real programmers don't use Python, real programmers us a magnetized needle and a steady hand.
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WOW NEVER WAS I THOUGHT THIS WOULD GET THIS BIG! I MEAN JUST PICK WHATEVER LANGUAGE WHICH IS SUITED FOR YOU IT IS SIMPLE. THE PEOPLE HERE ARE JUST GOING IN CIRCLES, LANGUAGE WARS ARE USELESS AND ANNOYING
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closed account (3qX21hU5)
No we use butterflies
Real Programmers use the Tao.
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