Do you think anybody can be a programmer and do you think it should be taught in elementary school?

Pages: 1234
Lol, you aren't getting anywhere if you are doing bad in math, especially since you are only 12.

I am 14 and love math. I am in honors math and taking math a level high than mine.

That "help" is a joke. I could have gave some one that advice 1 week after "Hello World".
Last edited on
no im in honors but i don't want to be. I'm not doing that horrible as its like an 85 or so. I'm going to ask to get extra credit to bring it up to a 90.

honors math isn't that hard but none of my friends are in it.

I have a perfect average in english and a few others.
Well, if you're having difficulty in math, it does depend on several factors. For one, what are you being taught? Depending on the actual level, the concepts can be rather easily explained when you're explaining them, not citing them as if they're a priori. If need-be, I could make a thread for math tutoring- I'm probably the one kid out of my entire school who not only loves math, but does absolutely absurd math equations for nothing more than fun (such as finding the formula for the area of the Sierpinski's Gasket, then integrating to infinity). I honestly believe that there is no such thing as a "math" and a "non-math" person. It's just a matter of whether there's any room for creativity in the subject.
I don't have difficulty with math, at all. I simply want to stay with my friends.

This year I'm actually starting to like math, when before I really didn't hate it, but it wasn't my favorite either.
I really didn't "feel it" in math, so to speak, until I got into calculus. That's where all the fun stuff happens and everything begins to make sense.
I think it's the group theory that really binds everything together.. but then my math professor was a group theory researcher.
As for programming in elementary school, I think it's good to be exposed to it, at least at turtle graphics level.
maths is driving me crazy, i was advised to learn it by my new uni but im learning it wrong i guess, i chose to learn from maths tutor.co.uk it started fun but got insane fast,

i remember when fun2code was going out of his way to teach me how to build a really good linked list program, i loved it, it took me a while but i got htere,

and then someone showed me the same thing but the template version and i understood it but it was hard and i was like neo just after he learned kung fu (woah) it was like staring into the abyss, at first it made sense, and then there were wheels within wheels and then there was that but within recursion and the possibilities seemed more and more numerous and I swear for a minute, that I saw what infinity was and what it looked like from the outside.

yeah since then i have found it hard to go back to maths, i start to feel a bit woozy and light headed
I never use templates. The compiler errors they sometimes generate are too long.
Sure, anyone can program, but the real question is whether or not the program is: 1) Reusable; 2) Robust; and 3) Useful, to the end user.

Introducing various trades to younger generations would definitely be a benefit to give them an idea of what they would like to be. However, anything introduced should be done so as a side thing or a short but sweet session to avoid biasing children into one specific trade.

Zereo wrote:

I know a whole bunch of people that know all about a language and its features but have no idea how to create a real world program.

How would a person like me get pass this, then? :( I have a feeling I'm one of those people.
I definitely think it should be introduced in schools. We need to fix kids mind sets these days though. I have friend who wanted to learn Java. Of course once he found out he couldnt just look up some youtube tutorials he forgot about it. We're way too lazy these days.
I think anybody can do anything that they are motivated to do. So to answer your first question I would say that anyone who is interested and motivated can learn to program. There are thousands of books and resources out there for people to simply pick up and study. It is not secret knowledge.

Can anyone be a professional programmer? Can anyone be a Doctor, Lawyer, Scientist or Airline pilot? Not every one can make money from it. But being an amateur / hobbyist programmer is the rite of passage that a hell of a lot of the 'pros' went through.

I do not think it should be taught in schools. In my view programming can only be learned - I went on a Masters degree course in computer science and I did not get 'taught' how to program. I had a crash course in Java to implement a term project and that was it. I concluded that it cannot be taught - each individual has to learn it themselves. After all the only way to learn how to program is to program.
Last edited on
Devon, that was beautiful. I'm not sure a templated linked-list class is worth an entire poem, though, but what the hell?
Devon never seizes to keep the community alive.
@Fredbill30

seizes?

seize /sēz/ Verb

- Take hold of suddenly and forcibly: "she jumped up and seized his arm".
- Capture (a place) using force.

So you're saying:

"Devon never takes hold of suddenly and forcibly to keep the community alive."

Which I (still) don't get.

Andy
Last edited on
Fredbill30 wrote:
Devon never seizes to keep the community alive.
I think "ceases" is the word you're looking for.
cease?

cease /sēs/ Verb

- Come to an end: "the hostilities had ceased and normal life was resumed"; "on his retirement the job will cease to exist".
- Bring (a specified action) to an end: "they were asked to cease all military activity".

"bring to an end" doesn't work with "keep ... alive". At least, not for me.

Andy
Last edited on
@OP No and no.
closed account (zb0S216C)
AlitCandle wrote:
"Do you think anybody can be a programmer"

To some degree, yes. However, some people simply don't have the mindset to comprehend most programming concepts and programming in general. Besides, some people simply don't have the genes to be a successful programmer.

AlitCandle wrote:
"do you think it should be taught in elementary school?"

No, because the idea is nothing short of being a failure. I think programming is a subject that will confuse most children. I mean, try teaching a kid the basics of dynamic memory allocation or the process of compiling and linking -- 9 times out of 10 the kid would rather do something more entertaining than listen to the theory of programming.

Wazzak
closed account (z05DSL3A)
Framework wrote:
I think programming is a subject that will confuse most children. I mean, try teaching a kid the basics of dynamic memory allocation or the process of compiling and linking

I'm not entirely sure what age 'elementary school' is (hence my guarded yes earlier). I'm thinking that they would be quite young and so teaching them with something like scratch would be appropriate.
http://scratch.mit.edu/
Framework wrote:
No, because the idea is nothing short of being a failure. I think programming is a subject that will confuse most children. I mean, try teaching a kid the basics of dynamic memory allocation or the process of compiling and linking -- 9 times out of 10 the kid would rather do something more entertaining than listen to the theory of programming.
I don't think anyone suggested teaching grade schoolers C or C++. I'm planning to start teaching my son programming when he is 7 or 8 years old (depending on his interest and ability) and will start with something simpler like BASIC or scratch (thank you Grey Wolf).

@Grey Wolf
Elementary school in the U.S. is kindergarten (usually 5 or 6 years old) to 12'th 5th or 6th grade.

Edit: Slip of the mind, thank you cire.
Last edited on
Pages: 1234