Important C++ for future game programmer

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What library?
If it's UDK then it should only take a few seconds.
It is? No wonder
IF it's UDK.
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The game is a demonstration, showing that 3D games can be made without that much math.
I don't use UDK. Besides that's just bloat.

I haven't started the game; I already said I am busy.
When I start, it'll probably take some where from 1-2 days.

It'll be pure OpenGL (maybe with OpenAL sound/music), and C or C++ (uncertain yet).
... I'll give you twenty dollars if you can make an FPS without "much maths" (after you post your source) subject to mine and others' opinion of your code.
I said "without that much math", and no 's'.

And FYI, it was just a reminding people of the original post...
What I really mean is without much complex math (my bad).

I was originally trying to explain that 3D games don't really require much math skill.
And are not significantly more difficult to create than 2D (once you master 2D, 3D seems easy).

He asked for an example, so I am making one.
When complete it will be posted in it's own thread.
The best way to learn is by doing. I suggest downloading CryEngine3 game engine. It's free to use but you can't sell your games without signing a contract with the developers.

Still, get the thing and learn how to use it and build a portfolio.

I am not in the game industry. Nor an indie developer. Just a hobbyist. But my next step is indie games and from there? Who knows maybe my own virtual studio.

If you did choose the path of schooling then get a degree in computer science, not game programming. Game programming can be self taught and generally considered by employers as futureless.
It's easy to "write an FPS" where you just have slow-moving bullets with a bounding box and a heightmap. Doing it right (using ray-tracing instead, a vertically diverse environment, 3D models designed by artists instead of just boxes, octree-based occlusion culling, any type of shadows that aren't billboards (stencil buffer-based/dynamic shadow map/baked lightmap), any sort of transparency via painter's algorithm, and much more) isn't as easy.

If you did choose the path of schooling then get a degree in computer science, not game programming. Game programming can be self taught and generally considered by employers as futureless.
Programming is programming. I've never seen anyone come out of my college with a game programming degree and struggle with finding a job.
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It will have pretty much all of those "not easy" features, except 3D models.
And it isn't going to be the "best" because I don't work for free.

Talking about it though, doesn't make it.
Programming is programming. I've never seen anyone come out of my college with a game programming degree and struggle with finding a job.


The game industry is extremly competitive and currently downsizing. Just look at how many were let go from companies like 'Electronic Arts'.

I mearly suggest a broad spectrum degree like computer science being safer than a narrow and potentially limiting degree like game programming.

Edit.

Also an article posted on gamedev.net suggests applicants with computer science degree are more hireable and with higher starting pay.
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