• Forum
  • Lounge
  • You being a programmer, what does penman

 
You being a programmer, what does penmanship mean to you

Pages: 123
Hello,

Upon realising my desperate need for improvement in my penmanship, it occurred to, me although I personally don't intend to become a full-time programmer, as a programmer yourself, what does penmanship mean to you?
Basically completely irrelevant.
I had to look at dictionary, to no avail.
Sorry, @keskiverto the word isn't in mine either.

Penmanship is the art or skill of writing by hand
Last edited on
I had to look at dictionary, to no avail.

https://www.dictionary.com/browse/penmanship

Upon realising my desperate need for improvement in my penmanship

Why must you improve? What would happen if you didn't?

Might as well ask what the color blue means to a programmer, the query would be just as nonsensical and pointless.
Just has to be good enough for me to read a week later. I don't take great care in making it neat. Anything important I type.

I will take slightly more care if I'm making a diagram, math-related plot, or visual model of something, but even then I recently just downloaded some CAD program and there are of course plotting and other models that can be made not on paper. So overall -- not important.

Edit: Also, you can't grep dead trees.
Last edited on
Thank you for your responses, that's all I needed to hear.


Why must you improve? What would happen if you didn't?
I suppose It's still critical for myself.

nonsensical and pointless.
Fair enough. It was just a sentence.

EDIT: Remarkable, the website's time is onpoint
Last edited on
in school, your professors/graders need to be able to read your work on tests. This will happen frequently in non-programming classes where you actually write things.

out of school, its up to you. you have dozens of other options, but I am old and I write things out on paper when I get a difficult problem to work through.

if you plan to teach or otherwise write on the whiteboard etc in a meeting and so on you need to be able to be understood.

Bottom line: its useful at times, and critical in school, and for some positions (again, drawing on the board for a team). But mostly, its useful while not being that big a deal in general.

My dad was a draftsman before becoming an engineer and he wrote so well it looked like a typewriter did it. It was pretty amazing.
Last edited on
Basically completely irrelevant.


Three areas spring to mind where penmanship could play an important part in an IT career.
1. Pen-based tablet applications.
2. Blender including addons and its commercial equivalents.
3. Character recognition - AI even.

Hardly irrelevant.

Your reply would be much better if you just left out that confrontational last line. Astra's question said was does penmanship mean to you. To helios, it doesn't mean much. That doesn't mean it means nothing to every person reading this thread.

EDIT: Remarkable, the website's time is onpoint
I, too, find this remarkable.

My dad was a draftsman before becoming an engineer and he wrote so well it looked like a typewriter did it
I have some reverence for non-computerized drafting, you have to put in a lot of focus to what you draw to avoid making mistakes, especially on a detailed draft. When doing drafting in school, I always disliked the parts where I had to write a lot in uppercase print.
Last edited on
Well, since the question is about our own subjective experiences, and I've never coded with a digital pen or in Blender, and I've never worked in handwriting recognition systems, I'm going to stick with my answer that penmanship has been irrelevant to my work.
@ganado Saying that shows a very limited experience in IT and an extremely narrow-minded approach to life, unlike me and the other value-add commenters here.
Last edited on
@helios

Thank you for giving your reasons, even though it was unnecessary. And by all means, stick to you opinion as you see fit.

The question I address is whether penmanship is irrelevant, not whether you can express your opinion or not, or whether you are right or wrong. I would not be so presumptuous to assign permission or approval to any commenter here. I'll leave that to presumptive nobody's like @ganado.

You and I both have made it clear what our opinions on that relevance aspect are and the OP can accept or reject them.

Is it your plan to antagonize as many members as possible as quickly as possible?
No, only the dickhead-know-nothing-snowflakes who are so easily 'offended'.
No, only the dickhead-know-nothing-snowflakes who are so easily 'offended'.
What a silly thing to write.

It's pretty immature to purposefully antagonize your audience and then complain about the reactions you get.

---

I had to improve my handwriting when I started studying mathematics. I got tired of getting symbols confused: xs and ys, vs and us, the \in and \epsilon, etc.

When I did that I taught myself to write proper longhand and I still do today. Some things are easier with a notebook than with a laptop.

Not relevant to me as a programmer, though. Occasionally I write programming-related stuff down if I'm not at my computer.
Last edited on
I recall often writing things down only to look at what I wrote and not being able to read it. In highschool, I had a teacher who would not accept my homework assignment, saying it wasn't legible. I quickly redid it, just copying it. It wasn't a masterpiece, but you could clearly read it. He rejected it again. I said "fuck it, I guess I'm not turning in this homework."

Good times.

Anyway, penmanship never even crosses my mind in any programming kind of way. In programming in general, it really has no significance.

1
2
3
4
Three areas spring to mind where penmanship could play an important part in an IT career.
1. Pen-based tablet applications.
2. Blender including addons and its commercial equivalents.
3. Character recognition - AI even.


1. Pen-based tablet applications would not care about penmanship, likely because they're going to implement an already coded writing recognition add-on, code, whatever. It's doubtful that every program that wants to have a writing feature is going to implement it's own thing every time. Even the built-in messaging apps have features that allow you to write with your finger/stylus - it's not unimaginable that this is a feature that an application can make use of since it's already on the phone.

3. This is very specific, in that someone is trying to code and application or a specific functionality which is directly concerned with penmanship. If I asked you, "what does sex mean to you in terms of programming," and you tell me "animated porn," it really has little to do with the programming itself. We're not talking about the realm of programming in general, but instead getting into specifics which don't directly relate to programming.
What a silly thing to write.

I guess telling you to MYOFB is out of the question too. Most of what I've seen of your contributions here is monotonously pompous un-useful garbage, all 2321 of them.
Pen-based tablet applications would not care about penmanship
From a very narrow-minded perspective that's right but you don't have to go very far to see the implementations wrt width, density, brush stoke, pressure sensitivity, nib management and so the list goes on.

Developments into the future need also be taken into account, not just the static world of apps mummy bought for me with my allowance.

Blender is a good example of programming animations, porn or otherwise - Python and ... tada .. C++.

Widen your horizons perhaps?
@ganado Saying that shows a very limited experience in IT
I avoid "experience in IT" as much as possible!
Pages: 123